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MrBlobby
09-25-2014, 04:06 AM
Scares the sh1t outa me.

Are you handy enough to undertake your own electrics, or do you always use a qualified thai electrician to do your electrical work.

Lots of instances around where people have been killed in thailand by electricity, that could have been avoided by implementation of improved standards.

Norton
09-25-2014, 10:00 AM
I do all my own electrics. Far less dangerous than having most Thai "electricians" do it.

MrBlobby
09-25-2014, 07:38 PM
Not just in the home, but when I walk down the sidewalk I am continually avoiding all the low strung balls of knitting of electric cables that seem to be everywhere.

Ampersand
09-25-2014, 08:49 PM
At least here you never have to ask why, during a light breeze or six drops of rain, your lights start to flicker and your internet connection no longer works... Electric city se-pah-get-tiiii !

1394

MrBlobby
09-26-2014, 06:42 AM
^ He He... Spaghetti Bolognese

luckyjim
09-26-2014, 05:04 PM
Whilst I agree it looks and probably is atrocious it has to be said that we have fewer outages here than in bloody Darwin.

MrBlobby
09-28-2014, 03:28 AM
One of the more riskier places looks to be in an electric shower cubicle.

Lots of fatalities due to poor earthing and circuit protection.

serrollt
09-28-2014, 05:46 PM
Used to do my own, though I am not all that good, learned my "skills" during my squatting years in London, but a few years ago the village standard has risen several notches, seems one of the locals did a proper training.

sulak
09-29-2014, 09:02 PM
Used to do my own, though I am not all that good, learned my "skills" during my squatting years in London, but a few years ago the village standard has risen several notches, seems one of the locals did a proper training.

Sure. It's a rare item, but there are a decent handful [Thai professionals] that are properly trained and are quite fit for anything that you might throw at them.

Delayed
01-12-2015, 06:01 PM
One of the more riskier places looks to be in an electric shower cubicle.

Lots of fatalities due to poor earthing and circuit protection.

I was wondering about this. My Inlaws house does not have grounds. When i plug in the computer you can feel the static on the machine. Charge it on the floor now. How hard is it to "ground" a house system. I swear here only 2 wires to the sockets. Also new water heater in shower 2 wires only.

Texpat
01-12-2015, 10:23 PM
Darwin, London, Thailand...

Hayseed idiots.

It's all about standards. American standards. Get with the program you provincial 'tards or suffer the consequences of your lax standards. :hello:

sabang
01-12-2015, 11:13 PM
Then get with the plot and convert to 220- 240 volt.

MrBlobby
01-13-2015, 03:12 AM
Darwin, London, Thailand...

Hayseed idiots.

It's all about standards. American standards. Get with the program you provincial 'tards or suffer the consequences of your lax standards. :hello:


Bad News Tex :mid:

2086

But Nil Desperandum :los:

2087

peterplonker
01-13-2015, 06:19 AM
So the American standard toilet is built with British standard specs. I am about to use an American standard toilet soon, to have an kiwi standard dump, so that makes me happy, happy & happy.

troy
01-14-2015, 04:33 PM
I was wondering about this. My Inlaws house does not have grounds. When i plug in the computer you can feel the static on the machine. Charge it on the floor now. How hard is it to "ground" a house system. I swear here only 2 wires to the sockets. Also new water heater in shower 2 wires only.

I suggest you get that shower earthed pronto. If it develops an electrical fault as it is then it will electrocute whoever is using it and they will DIE! At the bare minimum you need to have a consumer unit with an RCD that has a connection to an outside earth before even contemplating using one of those shower units. The same goes for a washing machine or, indeed, anything that has water associated with it. Wet skin will lower your resistance by 10-20 times and what was dangerous becomes too risky to think about.

MrBlobby
01-15-2015, 01:15 AM
I suggest you get that shower earthed pronto. If it develops an electrical fault as it is then it will electrocute whoever is using it and they will DIE! At the bare minimum you need to have a consumer unit with an RCD that has a connection to an outside earth before even contemplating using one of those shower units. The same goes for a washing machine or, indeed, anything that has water associated with it. Wet skin will lower your resistance by 10-20 times and what was dangerous becomes too risky to think about.

Good advice.
My own electric shower was earthed and had an RCD protection on it.
The RCD tripped off many times and I just reset it and carried on.
One time in the shower I could smell an acrid burning and eventually had a look inside the shower.
There was a loose connection on the over temperature protection switch was was arcing and had burnt back and off all the red insulation on the main live feed, and also the heat generated from the arc had started to melt the plastic enclosure.
Luckily no water was getting inside .

So I cut back the damaged cable, put the cable lug back on with pliers, and connected it back on the output side of the over temp cut out switch , thus bypassing it, and it all works fine again.

Don't do the last paragraph at home, it invalidates all guarantees , h & s , etc, get a new shower, I did as a temporary thing and as I could.

Might do a thread on my shower.

troy
01-15-2015, 08:26 AM
How hard is it to "ground" a house system.

Sorry, I missed this part of your post. The answer depends on how the electricity comes into the house from the meter. If it is into a consumer box then all is relatively simple otherwise you will need to buy one and start from there.

There are a few different style consumer boxes available in Thailand that can hold full size or miniature circuit breakers. Choose one that has the right input current rating (3x your meter rating so 15A meter is 45A or 50A Consumer unit) and make sure it has an RCD. When I did my house there were no individual RCD breakers available and no consumer units that allowed for ring circuits. Radial circuits are fine, I don't agree with the UK ring circuit method anyway.

The only earth rods I could find were a little short at 1.5m when they should really be at least 2.5m. Buy 2 of the 1.5m rods if they are all you can find and 2 acorn connectors and enough 10mm^2 single core to go from the earth rods to the consumer unit and from the consumer unit to your shower unit.

Dig a trench outside the house close to the consumer unit and preferably along the roof line so that rainwater will fall into the trench (moist earth around the ground rods will lower the resistance). For 1.5m rods the trench should be around 3m long and 1m deep. Bang in the earth rods at least 2m apart. Strip the 10mm^2 cable for the length between the rods and connect using the acorn connectors. Then connect to the earth point on the consumer unit. Fill the trench with earth up to the level of the rods and then fill with pebbles to provide good drainage.

I suggest wiring the same size earth from the consumer unit to your shower to make sure it cuts out quickly in case of a fault. The ground fault protector on the shower unit should be tested and retested at least every 6 months.

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Acorn clamp for the earth rods.