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View Full Version : Foreigners 'May Soon be Able to do 90-Day Reports at 7-Eleven Stores'



news junkie
10-24-2014, 04:18 AM
http://www.chiangmaicitynews.com/news.php?id=4557

Police Colonel Rutjapong Saravanangkool said officials had mooted plans that would allow foreigners to use a keycard or something similar when checking in at convenience stores. He would push this idea over the next year and hoped to make it a reality, he added.

He was speaking at a meeting organised by the Chiang Mai Expats Club at Le Meridien hotel this morning. A panel of immigration officers answered questions about the new visa rules that came into effect at the end of August. The new rules focus on retirement visas and 90 day check-in protocols.

Retirement O-A visas

Visas are still valid for a maximum of one year and are restricted to people aged 50 and over. Police Colonel Rutjapong hinted at an attempt to extend the maximum retirement visa length to three or five years, but this is still uncertain.

Applicants must have an income of 65,000 baht per month or have more than 800,000 baht in a single bank account over three months prior to application.

Joint bank accounts are no longer accepted. Retirement visas are now issued solely on an individual basis, and the earnings or other assets of a spouse or family member cannot be taken into account. Health certificates no more than six months old are required upon application.

Retirees can receive a one-year stamp while dependents receive three months that must then be extended at the Immigration office. Children are considered dependents up to the age of 20, or older if they have disabilities.

The panel also listed some key points in the new regulations:

1. If a change in the reason for residency occurs, the original permit is invalidated immediately. People on retirement visas are not allowed to work or volunteer, as these require a work permit issued on a business visa.

2. If the retiree dies, any dependents must immediately leave the country and apply for a personal visa such as a retirement or business visa.

3. Re-entry permits are still available, at a cost of 1,000 baht for single entry and 3,800 baht for multiple entry.

90-day check-ins

All foreigners in Thailand must check-in with Immigration every 90 days. They can do so in person at the Immigration office, or submit the forms by registered mail or via a third party. Police Colonel Rutjapong said the Chiang Mai Immigration office is almost at capacity, and encouraged people not to report there in person if possible.

Changing visa status

Under the new rules, changing one's visa status – for example, from a tourist visa to a retirement visa – can no longer be done in one day. The process will now take up to 21 days.

Immigration officers encourage people who wish to change their visas to apply as soon as possible. If someone enters the country on a 30-day tourist visa, for example, they should apply for a new visa within nine days to ensure they can remain in the country legally.

'Life certificates'

Police Colonel Rutjapong also said that Thai immigration authorities can no longer issue 'Life Certificates' for foreigners to use when applying for pensions. Any foreigner who requires one must now visit their respective embassy.

sabang
10-24-2014, 05:18 AM
Now that would be excellent. It's so archaic, this 90 day reporting stuff.

Norton
10-24-2014, 05:38 AM
Sure would. Will likely happen because it's more work for immigration employees and they get no cash for doing it.

Texpat
10-24-2014, 09:46 AM
Thai police relegating most of their duties lately to 7-11 clerks. Sounds about right. :popcorn:

Rest assured, they will make no changes unless there's something in it for them. Massive penalty for a lost card? Thousands of baht to have the card issued? RFID used to track cardholders? Use it as a foreigner ID card (mandatory to carry at all times $$$?)

If you believe for a second that anything they will do is for the convenience and benefit of foreigners, and not themselves, I believe you have your cranium in your anus. :los:

Charles
10-24-2014, 07:52 PM
Thai police relegating most of their duties lately to 7-11 clerks. Sounds about right. :popcorn:

Rest assured, they will make no changes unless there's something in it for them. Massive penalty for a lost card? Thousands of baht to have the card issued? RFID used to track cardholders? Use it as a foreigner ID card (mandatory to carry at all times $$$?)

If you believe for a second that anything they will do is for the convenience and benefit of foreigners, and not themselves, I believe you have your cranium in your anus. :los:It would make sense to add the required info to your Thai drivers licence and just swipe it through a card reader in 7/11. If you are here long term, it makes sense to get and carry a Thai Driving licence for insurance and ID anyway.

Texpat
10-24-2014, 10:10 PM
I agree with you Charles, that's not a bad idea. But you're thinking like a westerner. As long as foreigner-immigration contacts are viewed as opportunities, it'll never happen, unless there's another scheme to maintain the number of contacts. Every time whitey walks through the door at immigration, it's a potential payday. They're not going to give that up easily.

They should consider dropping the pretense and just have 7-11 sell the driver's licenses, too.

Norton
10-25-2014, 07:39 AM
If immigration was inclined to streamline 90 reporting of addresses the ideal solution would be to eliminate it. I understand the need to know the where abouts of foreigners. Requiring foreigners to report their address if changed since the last reported would fullfill the objective. Making 90 day reporting more convenient is fine but much better to dump the whole 90 day scheme. I worked with immigration years back. Got to know the head man of the immigration police. Agreed with him re the need but after a bit of discussion about the 90 day requirement he admitted it was put in place to generate revenue via the 2k baht fine if one fails to do the report. Tex is right. Immigration views us, it's customer, a source of revenue. Not unusual when dealing with a government bureaucracy. A visit to the US Embassy for any reason always results in a decrease in my net worth.

While a welcomed change, changing the 1 year extension to stay requirement to 3 years is much more problematic. Specifically in the 85k per month/800k per year financial requirement. Could be done but pretty sure change will be filed in the too hard box.

serrollt
10-25-2014, 06:31 PM
It would make sense to add the required info to your Thai drivers licence and just swipe it through a card reader in 7/11. If you are here long term, it makes sense to get and carry a Thai Driving licence for insurance and ID anyway.Not everybody has or wants to have a DR. DRs have nothing to do with immigration anyway, it's a different department.

Charles
10-26-2014, 12:31 AM
Not everybody has or wants to have a DR. DRs have nothing to do with immigration anyway, it's a different department.It would make life so much easier for all concerned. They are both government departments and the DL is a commonly accepted form of ID for any foreigner. I have used mine in hotels, police checkpoints and to gain Thai price access to national parks. I cycle most days and carry it in the underseat bum bag. If I get seriously injured, they can identify me immediately.
Most of those who choose to live here long term, need a DL even if it is only for a motor cycle. I fail to see your objection unless you go everywhere by taxi or public transport.
Even if that were the case, a DL costs only a few hundred baht and is ridiculously easy to obtain. It is a legal requirement for any one who is on a long term visa here if they want to drive.
It has the magnetic strip so your info can be verified and updated where necessary. What is your problem with it?

serrollt
10-26-2014, 05:27 PM
the DL is a commonly accepted form of ID for any foreigner. I have used mine in hotels, police checkpoints and to gain Thai price access to national parks.You've been lucky.
Only passports are acceptable IDs for obvious reasons.
Hotels need your passport and visa numbers to check you in. Police can only determine if you're legally in the country when they see the visa.
Visas are stamped into your passport, not your driving license.

Maybe a one-for-all electronic card is future music, but I don't see it now and the downside, centralised access to all personal data is not to be taken lightly.

Texpat
10-26-2014, 06:36 PM
Only passports are acceptable IDs for obvious reasons.

Liberal ****tards in the US and Europe consider that an invasion of privacy and a human rights violation. Why do you find it acceptable here? Did you know your passport number is on your Thai driver's license? Oh yeah, you don't have one (for good reason).


Hotels need your passport and visa numbers to check you in.
Why are hotels charged with policing? I thought that was 7-11's responsibility. Anyway, if you have your wife/girlfriend/ladyboy lover check in, nobody asks squat. What's the point in that fruitless exercise in bureaucratic masturbation?


Police can only determine if you're legally in the country when they see the visa. Seig Heil! Veah ahh your paperz? You must feel right at home with Thailand's new martial law policy. I'm developing an understanding of how Warsaw Jews felt, circa 1940. Put the info into a DL magnetic strip and a cop can verify it at any 7-11.


Visas are stamped into your passport, not your driving license.
You are quite observant. Have a gold star.:kiss:


centralised access to all personal data is not to be taken lightly.

But handing over your passport information to a hotel clerk is OK? You are a walking, talking contradiction.

Chitown
10-26-2014, 06:47 PM
Most 7-11 employees speak English? Where ins America? Certainly not Thailand.

Charles
10-26-2014, 07:36 PM
You've been lucky.
Only passports are acceptable IDs for obvious reasons.
Hotels need your passport and visa numbers to check you in. Police can only determine if you're legally in the country when they see the visa.
Visas are stamped into your passport, not your driving license.

Maybe a one-for-all electronic card is future music, but I don't see it now and the downside, centralised access to all personal data is not to be taken lightly.
I don't believe I have been lucky at all. Anecdotally it seems to be quite a common and sensible practice. As tex pointed out, it has your passport number on it already. I would feel a lot better protected by using my DL as ID and it seems to be fairly simple to add data to it.
It would also answer Jao tin's issue with 7-11 staff language skills. If a farang goes to a 7-11 counter and hands over his DL, it can only mean one thing. he needs the card swiped and his 90 day report recorded. No need even to speak, just smile. Even the dumbest 7-11 clerk could be taught to do that.
I have never had language issues with 7-11 staff, out here in the sticks or in tourist areas or the capital.
Anyway Stroller, you will have to report to immigration with yours but at least it won't be so crowded. :)

serrollt
10-26-2014, 09:31 PM
Liberal ****tards in the US and Europe consider that an invasion of privacy and a human rights violation. Why do you find it acceptable here? In Europe only passports are accepted as IDs? And that's regarded as "a human rights violation"? :rotfl:

Ignorant seppo... :socal:


Why are hotels charged with policing? I thought that was 7-11's responsibility. No, 7-11s do not handle hotel check-ins, soc..., err, tex. :socal:


Anyway, if you have your wife/girlfriend/ladyboy lover check in, nobody asks squat. What's the point in that fruitless exercise in bureaucratic masturbation?
Ask Thai immigration.


Seig Heil! Veah ahh your paperz? You must feel right at home with Thailand's new martial law policy. I'm developing an understanding of how Warsaw Jews felt, circa 1940. Put the info into a DL magnetic strip and a cop can verify it at any 7-11.
It's been a requirement to carry your passport in Thailand long before martial law. Much better if you must have a DL, eh?

Stupid seppo. :popcorn:



But handing over your passport information to a hotel clerk is OK? You are a walking, talking contradiction.
Darn, you missed the point yet again. Is various personal info available from a magnetic strip on your passport for the hotel clerk?

Silly seppo. :rolleyes:

Norton
10-27-2014, 09:27 AM
It's been a requirement to carry your passport in Thailand long before martial law.
Urban myth. Never been a requirement to "carry" your passport. "Produce" it if requested is the requirement.
Minor point. No intent to interrupt the gripping seppo/kraut debate.
Carry on.

peterplonker
10-27-2014, 02:43 PM
It would also answer Jao tin's issue with 7-11 staff language skills. If a farang goes to a 7-11 counter and hands over his DL, it can only mean one thing. he needs the card swiped and his 90 day report recorded. No need even to speak, just smile. Even the dumbest 7-11 clerk could be taught to do that.
I have never had language issues with 7-11 staff, out here in the sticks or in tourist areas or the capital.
:)
charles you obviously don't interact with 7/ 11 staff here in Udon, very nice people but dumber than socal on his bad day,
I just went to my local7/11 when I purchased frozen meal, the girls said wawe mai, I didn't understand that she was asking if I wanted the meal heated in the Micro wave? maybe because I am unused to those horrible devices.
But for a moment I didn't understand what she wanted.

serrollt
10-27-2014, 04:31 PM
Urban myth. Never been a requirement to "carry" your passport. "Produce" it if requested is the requirement.
Minor point. No intent to interrupt the gripping seppo/kraut debate.
Carry on.How do you produce your passport for examination at a check point when you do not carry it with you? :popcorn:

Mid
10-27-2014, 04:51 PM
Do I have to carry my Passport at all times (http://thai888.com/wp/?p=138)
July 31, 2014

Deputy Commander Voravat confirmed that foreign tourists and expats do not need to carry their passports with them at all times.

He said that tourists can of course leave their passports locked in their hotel safe and enjoy their holiday in Thailand without worrying about the need to carry their original passport.

Deputy Commander Voravat also said that for expats living here, a Thai driving license or photocopy of your passport can be used as a form of identification.

However, if Immigration Police suspect an individual to be overstaying in Thailand or being involved in illegal activity, then the individual would be required to produce their original passport promptly.

Deputy Commander Voravat referred to Section 58, which reads as follows:

Any alien who has no lawful document for entering the Kingdom under section 12(1);….under this Act; and has no identification in accordance with the Law on Alien registration, is considered to have entered the Kingdom in violation of the Act.

Entering or staying in Thailand without holding a valid passport and visa/extension is subject a fine and possible prison sentence.

“Making all foreigners in Thailand carry their original passports with them would be very difficult.”

“It’s about being reasonable and using common sense”

“But if we think a foreigner is involved in illegal activity then we will of course need to see their original passport, this is normal”, said Deputy Commander Voravat.

Deputy Commander Voravat is eager to avoid further misunderstandings and miscommunication regarding immigration matters and is happy to provide correct information to foreign tourists and the wider expat community in Thailand.

The idea of foreigners being able to get a copy of their passport officially stamped (http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/747147-immigration-foreigners-must-now-carry-valid-id-at-all-times-report-within-24-hours/) by Immigration is currently not an option. However, it is always a good idea to have a copy of your passport with you at all times while in Thailand.

thai888.com

serrollt
10-27-2014, 05:35 PM
Good find, mid.

I stand corrected. :coffee:

Charles
10-27-2014, 07:06 PM
charles you obviously don't interact with 7/ 11 staff here in Udon, very nice people but dumber than socal on his bad day,
I just went to my local7/11 when I purchased frozen meal, the girls said wawe mai, I didn't understand that she was asking if I wanted the meal heated in the Micro wave? maybe because I am unused to those horrible devices.
But for a moment I didn't understand what she wanted.
Peter you're right I don't. Without wishing to belabour the point too much, i still think it's a very good idea.
Given the limited capabilities of 7-11 clerks, the process would have to be very simple. Teaching them to use a card reader and issue a receipt is about as much as they could handle. As a driving licence would serve only one purpose in a 7-11, just hand it over and smile.
(And hope she does not microwave it). :rotfl:

Dr Earl
11-03-2014, 05:53 PM
I stand corrected.

nope that wont do... you bend over and assume the position to accept punishment.:party:

RubbaJohnny
11-04-2014, 11:12 AM
Many of Bond gadgets of 1960s GPS satnav etc are normal.

Subcutaneous machine readable data like dogs have will seem attractive to controlling governments.It will be better than print or retina scan as will match DNA so while perhaps identical twins could clone no one else.

They'll start with the young with 'must have' incentives free i-Something or a tattoo I'm an idiot.Or the "opportunity" to see Miley

This will later become a "666' payment and tracking device

It will remove all airport security nonsense,passports visas credit cards
Not sure I'll live to see it here in the sticks but the convenience to authority.

It will be IMHO the ultimate Brand loyalty.
If you need to be scanned to but anything then policing tracking will be easier plus of course the ability to sell and market to targeted segments as we already see with so called "Smart phones/tables" which will look as funny to kids as the early mobile Nokia bricks, stylophones and cassette recorders do today.

Dan
11-04-2014, 08:58 PM
charles you obviously don't interact with 7/ 11 staff here in Udon, very nice people but dumber than socal on his bad day,
I just went to my local7/11 when I purchased frozen meal, the girls said wawe mai, I didn't understand that she was asking if I wanted the meal heated in the Micro wave? maybe because I am unused to those horrible devices.
But for a moment I didn't understand what she wanted.

She was asking you a question in perfectly normal, everyday Thai. You might not have understood but that doesn't make her dumb.

Cyrille
10-26-2015, 07:46 AM
http://www.chiangmaicitynews.com/news.php?id=4557

Police Colonel Rutjapong Saravanangkool said officials had mooted plans that would allow foreigners to use a keycard or something similar when checking in at convenience stores. He would push this idea over the next year and hoped to make it a reality, he added.

He was speaking at a meeting organised by the Chiang Mai Expats Club at Le Meridien hotel this morning. A panel of immigration officers answered questions about the new visa rules that came into effect at the end of August. The new rules focus on retirement visas and 90 day check-in protocols.

Retirement O-A visas

Visas are still valid for a maximum of one year and are restricted to people aged 50 and over. Police Colonel Rutjapong hinted at an attempt to extend the maximum retirement visa length to three or five years, but this is still uncertain.

Applicants must have an income of 65,000 baht per month or have more than 800,000 baht in a single bank account over three months prior to application.

Joint bank accounts are no longer accepted. Retirement visas are now issued solely on an individual basis, and the earnings or other assets of a spouse or family member cannot be taken into account. Health certificates no more than six months old are required upon application.

Retirees can receive a one-year stamp while dependents receive three months that must then be extended at the Immigration office. Children are considered dependents up to the age of 20, or older if they have disabilities.

The panel also listed some key points in the new regulations:

1. If a change in the reason for residency occurs, the original permit is invalidated immediately. People on retirement visas are not allowed to work or volunteer, as these require a work permit issued on a business visa.

2. If the retiree dies, any dependents must immediately leave the country and apply for a personal visa such as a retirement or business visa.

3. Re-entry permits are still available, at a cost of 1,000 baht for single entry and 3,800 baht for multiple entry.

90-day check-ins

All foreigners in Thailand must check-in with Immigration every 90 days. They can do so in person at the Immigration office, or submit the forms by registered mail or via a third party. Police Colonel Rutjapong said the Chiang Mai Immigration office is almost at capacity, and encouraged people not to report there in person if possible.

Changing visa status

Under the new rules, changing one's visa status – for example, from a tourist visa to a retirement visa – can no longer be done in one day. The process will now take up to 21 days.

Immigration officers encourage people who wish to change their visas to apply as soon as possible. If someone enters the country on a 30-day tourist visa, for example, they should apply for a new visa within nine days to ensure they can remain in the country legally.

'Life certificates'

Police Colonel Rutjapong also said that Thai immigration authorities can no longer issue 'Life Certificates' for foreigners to use when applying for pensions. Any foreigner who requires one must now visit their respective embassy.

Brilliant that the land has so much talent in languages and International experts that volunteering is illegal !

I have froends who were pilots,military Drs teachers yet none can donate time expertise and skills to local school hospital or barracks !