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  • #31
    Originally posted by Boots View Post

    Boil.....hard boiled eggs.

    I usually cook for myself at home.


    Overweight and Lonely? A Representative Study on Loneliness in Obese People and Its Determinants


    Abstract
    Obesity is associated with physical and medical restrictions and comorbidities, but it also entails psychosocial effects such as social isolation and feelings of rejection. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between loneliness and weight stigma in a large sample of obese individuals. Results were derived from a large representative sample (n = 1,000). The survey included the 3-item version of the UCLA loneliness scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as well as the Weight Bias Internalization scale (WBIS). The mean UCLA score was 1.943 (SD = 0.771). Respondents with higher levels of depression (B = 0.176), higher internalized weight bias (B = 0.435), and the experience of discrimination (B = 0.286) reported higher levels of loneliness. Future studies should investigate the mediation pathways between obesity, loneliness, and its determinants to provide a framework for successful interventions as part of obesity management programs.

    Discussion
    According to the current study, a higher BMI can be associated with higher levels of depression, higher internalization of weight bias, and a higher rate of discrimination experiences. Furthermore, the self-reported health status was significantly worse among those participants with higher BMI categories. This could account for the generally high level of loneliness observed in this sample, as obesity has been linked to worse self-reported health only in the presence of high levels of loneliness [28]. When comparing weight categories, obese individuals are in general lonelier in the current sample, regardless of their class of obesity. This has been shown in previous studies as well [29]. Secondly, with regard to loneliness, participants with higher levels of depression, higher internalized weight bias, and the experience of discrimination reported higher levels of loneliness.

    Conclusions
    Overall, the results of the current study suggest that loneliness may occur more often in obese individuals and that it is related to depressive symptoms, greater self-stigma, and weight discrimination. Social isolation or loneliness is known to be a risk factor for precarious health and greater mortality. Loneliness is also linked to obesity; however, cause and effect in this relationship still remain unclear. It may be seen as a complication or a trigger for obesity. Therefore, loneliness should be acknowledged as a public health challenge that needs to be addressed in terms of multidisciplinary weight management. Avoidance of medical care (i.e., due to social withdrawal or a lack of trust in others) could increase the burden and lower overall quality of life. On the other hand, it may lower the incidence of help-seeking behavior in terms of weight management. If people understand the complexity of this disease, stigmatization and discrimination may be eliminated and, thereby, reduce social distancing. On the other hand, if obese individuals feel understood and accepted, they may not fear social situations as a threat [34, 35]. It could be one way to support those you are vulnerable to weight bias by increasing trust and helping them to build up social networks, because social relationships are important not only for physical health but also for emotional and psychological well-being.

    Fat people need to get a life/out more: https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/500095

    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

    Comment


    • #32
      Fat foks should pay more for airline tickets.

      Or better still, give a total allowance for passenger + luggage, every kg over incurs an extra charge.
      “Don’t get sick of me just yet, for I will be here for quite a while”

      Comment


      • #33
        ^^ Mr. Landreth,

        I cooked hard-boiled eggs (5 at a time) and eat about 2 per day or every other day. sometimes three.

        I don't think a person can sustain themselves only on an egg diet - but I know you're joking again.
        LWO Community strong!

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by serrollt View Post
          Fat foks should pay more for airline tickets.
          Some are inconsiderate.

          I was in New York at a play (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child) a couple years ago. This play was extremely long. The intermission to the play was over a couple hours if I remember right. You had to leave the building and come back.

          Anyway,……Big woman and her mother (another big woman) sat next to me. Seats in the theater were small to begin with. I could or most any normal person would fit comfortably in the seat, but not the woman (or her mother). She was oozing out of her seat. One quarter of the woman was over into my seat. That was the first segment of the play.

          The second segment her mother sat next to me,……. oozing from her seat into mine.

          Worst 7 to 8 hours I spent next to two strange women in my life. They should have a special section for those people also. Triple wide seats and make them pay triple for their ticket.

          Put the fvckin’ spoon down.

          Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

          Comment


          • #35
            Eating Disorders

            There is a commonly held misconception that eating disorders are a lifestyle choice. Eating disorders are actually serious and often fatal illnesses that are associated with severe disturbances in people’s eating behaviors and related thoughts and emotions. Preoccupation with food, body weight, and shape may also signal an eating disorder. Common eating disorders include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder.

            Signs and Symptoms/Anorexia nervosa
            People with anorexia nervosa may see themselves as overweight, even when they are dangerously underweight. People with anorexia nervosa typically weigh themselves repeatedly, severely restrict the amount of food they eat, often exercise excessively, and/or may force themselves to vomit or use laxatives to lose weight. Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder. While many people with this disorder die from complications associated with starvation, others die of suicide.

            Symptoms include:

            Extremely restricted eating
            Extreme thinness (emaciation)
            A relentless pursuit of thinness and unwillingness to maintain a normal or healthy weight
            Intense fear of gaining weight
            Distorted body image, a self-esteem that is heavily influenced by perceptions of body weight and shape, or a denial of the seriousness of low body weight

            Other symptoms may develop over time, including:

            Thinning of the bones (osteopenia or osteoporosis)
            Mild anemia and muscle wasting and weakness
            Brittle hair and nails
            Dry and yellowish skin
            Growth of fine hair all over the body (lanugo)
            Severe constipation
            Low blood pressure slowed breathing and pulse
            Damage to the structure and function of the heart
            Brain damage
            Multiorgan failure
            Drop in internal body temperature, causing a person to feel cold all the time
            Lethargy, sluggishness, or feeling tired all the time
            Infertility

            Bulimia nervosa
            People with bulimia nervosa have recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amounts of food and feeling a lack of control over these episodes. This binge-eating is followed by behavior that compensates for the overeating such as forced vomiting, excessive use of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, excessive exercise, or a combination of these behaviors. People with bulimia nervosa may be slightly underweight, normal weight, or over overweight.

            Symptoms include:

            Chronically inflamed and sore throat
            Swollen salivary glands in the neck and jaw area
            Worn tooth enamel and increasingly sensitive and decaying teeth as a result of exposure to stomach acid
            Acid reflux disorder and other gastrointestinal problems
            Intestinal distress and irritation from laxative abuse
            Severe dehydration from purging of fluids
            Electrolyte imbalance (too low or too high levels of sodium, calcium, potassium, and other minerals) which can lead to stroke or heart attack

            Binge-eating disorder
            People with binge-eating disorder lose control over his or her eating. Unlike bulimia nervosa, periods of binge-eating are not followed by purging, excessive exercise, or fasting. As a result, people with binge-eating disorder often are overweight or obese. Binge-eating disorder is the most common eating disorder in the U.S.

            Symptoms include:

            Eating unusually large amounts of food in a specific amount of time, such as a 2-hour period
            Eating even when you're full or not hungry
            Eating fast during binge episodes
            Eating until you're uncomfortably full
            Eating alone or in secret to avoid embarrassment
            Feeling distressed, ashamed, or guilty about your eating
            Frequently dieting, possibly without weight loss

            Risk Factors
            Eating disorders can affect people of all ages, racial/ethnic backgrounds, body weights, and genders. Eating disorders frequently appear during the teen years or young adulthood but may also develop during childhood or later in life. These disorders affect both genders, although rates among women are higher than among men. Like women who have eating disorders, men also have a distorted sense of body image.

            Researchers are finding that eating disorders are caused by a complex interaction of genetic, biological, behavioral, psychological, and social factors. Researchers are using the latest technology and science to better understand eating disorders.

            One approach involves the study of human genes. Eating disorders run in families. Researchers are working to identify DNA variations that are linked to the increased risk of developing eating disorders.

            Brain imaging studies are also providing a better understanding of eating disorders. For example, researchers have found differences in patterns of brain activity in women with eating disorders in comparison with healthy women. This kind of research can help guide the development of new means of diagnosis and treatment of eating disorders.

            Treatments and Therapies
            It is important to seek treatment early for eating disorders. People with eating disorders are at higher risk for suicide and medical complications. People with eating disorders can often have other mental disorders (such as depression or anxiety) or problems with substance use. Complete recovery is possible.

            Treatment plans are tailored to individual needs and may include one or more of the following:

            Individual, group, and/or family psychotherapy
            Medical care and monitoring
            Nutritional counseling
            Medications
            Psychotherapies
            Psychotherapies such as a family-based therapy called the Maudsley approach, where parents of adolescents with anorexia nervosa assume responsibility for feeding their child, appear to be very effective in helping people gain weight and improve eating habits and moods.

            To reduce or eliminate binge-eating and purging behaviors, people may undergo cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which is another type of psychotherapy that helps a person learn how to identify distorted or unhelpful thinking patterns and recognize and change inaccurate beliefs.

            Medications
            Evidence also suggests that medications such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, or mood stabilizers may also be helpful for treating eating disorders and other co-occurring illnesses such as anxiety or depression. Check the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) website: (http://www.fda.gov/), for the latest information on warnings, patient medication guides, or newly approved medications.: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topi...rs/index.shtml


            Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

            Comment


            • #36
              On Alcohol, Alcohol Use Disorders and Weight Gain


              The Calorie Factor

              There’s no question that alcoholic beverages are loaded with what nutritionists call “empty calories.”

              At its face value of about 7 calories per gram, alcohol comes close to fat at approximately 9 calories per gram. (In my training as a registered dietitian, we were taught that alcohol “counts” as a fat in the diet of someone with diabetes.)

              The other energy-containing nutrients that make up food – protein and carbohydrates – have 4 calories per gram, significantly fewer for the same unit of measure. So fat and alcohol (and foods and beverages with high levels of them) are considered more “calorically dense.” (Of course, alcoholic beverages often come bottled with lots of added sugar and sometimes fat, as in Irish cream.)

              The National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Offers an alcohol calorie calculator for various alcohol-containing beverages at its Rethinking Drinking link.

              Snip

              The bottom line is that alcohol calories count more in moderate non-daily imbibers than in daily heavy consumers. For the vast majority of people who drink alcohol socially and don’t have a problem with it, their alcohol calories can lead to weight gain and count toward excess body fat. So a good way for social drinkers to lose weight is to cut down on or cut out alcohol.: https://www.rehabs.com/pro-talk/on-a...d-weight-gain/

              Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

              Comment


              • #37
                ^ That's why I rarely imbib these days.
                LWO Community strong!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Boots View Post
                  ^ That's why I rarely imbib these days.
                  Originally posted by Boots View Post
                  Weight: 93.5 kilos (up from 92.2).
                  What have you got to lose, fatty?



                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Ergenburgensmurgen View Post


                    What have you got to lose, fatty?


                    About 2-3 K if I cut.....

                    And you?
                    LWO Community strong!

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Boots View Post

                      And you?
                      And me what?

                      Unlike you I'm not obese.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Ergenburgensmurgen View Post

                        And me what?

                        Unlike you I'm not obese.
                        Nice try, once again.

                        I ain't obese.
                        LWO Community strong!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Boots View Post

                          I ain't obese.
                          You posted on TD that you are 5'9" and here that you are 93.5 kilos.

                          That makes you obese.

                          And a liar.

                          A lying fat cnut.



                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Ergenburgensmurgen View Post

                            You posted on TD that you are 5'9" and here that you are 93.5 kilos.

                            That makes you obese.

                            And a liar.

                            A lying fat cnut.


                            Every heard of LBM? Lean Body Mass? Muscle?
                            LWO Community strong!

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Boots View Post

                              Every heard of LBM? Lean Body Mass? Muscle?
                              Yes I have.

                              How is any of that relevant to you, lardarse,

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Ergenburgensmurgen View Post

                                Yes I have.

                                How is any of that relevant to you, lardarse,

                                You better start honing your eating and lifting program for August 1st.
                                LWO Community strong!

                                Comment

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