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Thammasat University Massacre, 6th October 1976. Bangkok.

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  • marmite
    replied
    Dreadful stuff.

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  • Mid
    replied
    The black hole of Thai society

    181006Arun.jpg

    http://2bangkok.com/the-black-hole-of-thai-society.html

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  • Bonglek
    replied
    Very interesting thread. Although I am familiar with this sad bit of Thai history it has revived my interest.

    Several years ago I distinctly remember watching a movie clip of this atrocity along with one showing the piled and burning bodies of the student victims. Even posted the link on TD but can't find it now. Another was of terrified people crowding into the then Royal hotel ( name since changed )

    Wish I could find those videos again and forward them to interested parties if it would help identify the ' chair man '.

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  • Mid
    replied
    The Search for the Chair Man Diaryhttp://doct6.com/archives/2665) which made us realize that we had to work on it seriously.

    Undoubtedly, we were also looking for the Chair Man, as Acharn Thongchai (Winichakul) told us that the man had appeared in many of the violent scenes. The attached photos indicated that he was involved in at least three deaths: the one in Ulevich's photo, the hanging of Wichitchai Amornkul (a 2nd year student of the Faculty of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University) and the burning of the four bodies. Acharn Thongchai said he saw another photo of the same man sitting on top of the body of a woman who had been stripped naked, but we could not find it. (If you have the photo, please send it to the project). The important question was: what did it mean when the very same person appeared to take part in many of the most atrocious crimes on that particular morning?

    Since early 2016 when I started to get involved with the October 6 Project, I recalled how, in 2011, my son, a Matthayom 2 (8th Grade) student, related to me about his khon (traditional Thai theatre) teacher at school who proudly told his students that he had been involved in the use of violence against the students on October the 6th. My son said that this teacher was aggressive and rude; he liked to hit children as punishment and they were very afraid of him. I didn't really like what I heard. My son also wasn't happy with this school, which was a famous private school where most children came from wealthy families. But he stayed there only for one semester and quit. Therefore I stopped paying attention to the matter.

    But in 2016 when I got involved with the research on the October 6th incident and our team was interested in seeking and interviewing members of the right-wing mob involved in or witnessing the violence at Sanam Luang, I asked my son whether he remembered the name of his khon teacher just in case the man would agree to be interviewed. We wanted to know why he was at the incident, whether he acted on his own or which group he belonged to, etc.

    My son remembered the teacher's name and helped me find the man on the internet. Unfortunately, the man had just recently passed away from a serious illness in 2015. Among the information my son found, there was a portrait photo of that teacher. I asked Phattharaphon and my family members to look at the photo. But none of them could confirm that he was the Chair Man, despite the fact that he had a similar square-shaped face, flat nose and prominent jawline. I kept this in mind and returned to the photo quite often. Then one day someone gave some long-kept photos to Phattharaphon for the October 6 Project, and among them there was a full face photo of the Chair Man. This showed that the face structure of the teacher and the Chair Man were very similar. Therefore Phattharaphon and I turned to following up the matter seriously once again but in the end we concluded that the two were not the same person. However I would like to document the search process as it shows a lot about the sickness of people.

    I told Phattharaphon that we should seek information from the school. Very fortunately, a younger friend of Phattharaphon had recently been assigned to write the school's history and therefore could access information about the school. This friend of Phattharaphon was an alumnus; he said that the teacher had once been fired because he injured a colleague, but the school later took him back. He himself and many of his younger and older friends remembered well how this teacher talked about his heroism on October 6th in class: how he was the one to 'open the scene of' (start) the hangings on Sanam Luang, how he helped to free one student, who had been shot but was not yet dead, from his suffering by beating his head with a brick to kill him, and so on. I believed all generations of students who had studied with this teacher must have had to hear about his heroism. Phattharaphon's friend was around 10 years older than my son yet they shared the same experience.

    Phattharaphon also got the phone number of the teacher's family. We together called and talked with the wife of the teacher who said her husband also used to tell her and the children how he was involved in October 6th. We cropped the face of the Chair Man from the photo and send it to her; she insisted that it was not her husband. Finally, we obtained a photo of the teacher as a young man, which confirmed that the two persons were not the same. The search therefore ceased.

    What shocked and saddened us about this was the thought of what kind of society makes a person still feel proud of his own brutal acts, although almost 40 years have passed. Age did not help enable a human being to reconsider his past actions, actions against a 'political enemy' that he had never personally known, but which made him proud of himself ever since.

    This story was first published on Puangthong's Facebook account.




    The Chair Man is an iconic picture of the 6 October Massacre

    prachatai.com

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  • crazy dog
    replied
    well we wont be seeing this mentioned or discussed on the telly, nationalist butchery

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  • Mid
    replied


    https://doct6.com/

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  • Mid
    replied
    Meet online archives of 1976 massacrewww.doct6.comSecurity officers force student activist to lie face-down on the football field during the event
    (Photo from 6doct)

    prachatai.com

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  • Mid
    replied
    Court confirms ban on film touching on 1976 student massacre
    prachatai.org

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  • Mid
    replied
    ^

    Bangkok Critics Assembly Awards held last night at the Thai Army Club.

    To be honest I do not know what to make of that ............

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  • Mid
    replied

    Kaewta Ketbungkan
    March 30, 2017



    BANGKOKthe film is now back in theaters and can be seen through Sunday at SF Cinema in the CentralWorld shopping mall.

    Wandering



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  • Mid
    replied
    Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.

    BQgCCU0.jpg

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  • Mid
    replied
    Culture of impunity and the Thai ruling class: Interview with Puangthong Pawakapan

    Puangthong Pawakapan
    (file Photo)

    An enduring fear
    The perpetrators remain at large
    The deeply-ingrained culture of impunity
    Networks of the Thai ruling class
    A lesson to learn before it is too late
    This article was translated from Thai into English by Tyrell Haberkorn

    prachatai.org

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  • Mid
    replied
    Little change since 1976, say Thai massacre survivors
    Max Constant
    06.10.2016

    Survivors of massacre at Bangkok university claim authorities still inciting hatred among various groups for own benefit


    Vipar Daomanee, who lost many friends on Oct. 6, 1976 when around 100 students at a Thai university were lynched, burnt alive and shot by right wing militias in what became known as the most traumatic event in Thai contemporary history
    (Photo:Max Constant)

    On Oct. 6, 1976, around 100 students at a Thai university were lynched, burnt alive and shot by right-wing militias, spurred on by their chanting and smiling countrymen.

    Many of those who stood by and cheered had been wrongly convinced that their army was purging the country of communist anti-monarchy forces.

    Forty years on, some of the students who stood by helplessly as barricades were broken down and their colleagues dragged to their deaths claim authorities are still unable to admit their role in the event, and that little has changed in how Thailand is run.


    The government was run at that time by Seni Pramoj, a conservative politician from an aristocratic background, who, according to then-Thammasat University rector Puey Ungphakorn, ordered the assault.

    Notcharit, who was a 19-year-old student at Thammasat at the time, said he only managed to escape the massacre by fleeing to the back of the university in the historic area of Bangkok and diving into the Chao Phraya river, from where he was able to hide in a nearby house with the help of sympathetic residents.


    On Thursday morning, tributes took take place across universities in the Thai capital to those who died and suffered at the hands of the police and right-wing groups -- many of which carried names akin to boy scout movements: the Red Gaurs, Nawaphon and Village Scout.

    The groups accused the students of having communist sympathies, of trying to destroy the Thai monarchy, and of fueling the revolutions that had overthrown corrupt feudal systems in neighboring Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos.

    Much of the anger was nourished by members of extreme right-wing, patriotic Buddhist organizations active during the country's short democratic period in the mid-1970s.

    One -- Nawaphon (new or ninth force) -- was influenced by then popular monk Kittiwuttho Bhikkhu, who was opposed to parliamentary democracy, campaigned for the three principles of nation, religion, and monarchy and infamously claimed in 1976 that the killing of communists was not a sin -- effectively encouraging the act in Buddhist majority Thailand.

    Scores of students were killed during the assault in what became known as the most traumatic event in Thai contemporary history.

    Images taken on the day and quickly smuggled out of the country for fear of them being destroyed show students being beaten and lynched on tamarind trees in front of laughing crowds.

    Others were dragged along the lawn of the nearby Royal Plaza by nooses strung around their necks, while hundreds were stripped, beaten and forced by armed police to lie on the university football pitch.

    Today -- Oct. 6, 2016 -- most of the dead have still not been named.


    Notcharit told Anadolu Agency this week that when he returned to the site of the beatings to study "two or three years after", he was fraught with anger.



    Vipar Daomanee participated in the student movements of 1976, but she says she was not in Thammasat on that fateful day.

    Talking to Anadolu Agency, Daomanee -- now 60 years old -- says after losing many friends on the day, she has since campaigned to keep their memory alive.

    She says that 15 years ago she and fellow campaigners managed to convince the government of the time to allow the construction of a small memorial to the dead in a corner of quiet Thammasat.

    But getting authorities to recognize the injustice of the day has been a completely different matter.



    On October 14, a mass pro-democracy uprising across the country was brutally repressed by then dictator Field Marshall Thanom Kittikachorn.

    Dozens of people were killed in Bangkok in street battles when Kittikachorn's troops opened fire on demonstrators.

    Soon after, Kittikachorn was forced to cede power and went into exile after he lost the support of the military and King Bhumibol Adulyadej.



    In today's Thailand, a new generation of student activists opposed to the country's latest junta see parallels between their struggle against authoritarianism and that initiated by their elders 40 years ago.



    Thammasat survivor Notcharit says his biggest regret is that little has changed in the way the country is run in the last 40 years.


    Ex-PM Shinawatra -- deposed by the junta in 2006 -- is the elder brother of Yingluck Shinawatra, whose government was overthrown in 2014 by the present military junta.

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  • Mid
    replied
    "Thais dare not ask this question to me. . ."
    Thursday, February 14, 2008

    UPYKj2Y.jpg

    http://jotman.blogspot.com.au/2008/0...ion-to-me.html

    This jotman page is well worth a look .

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  • Mid
    replied
    The brutal Bangkok crackdown that was hushed up for years
    5 October 2016



    When Thai soldiers opened fire on students demonstrating at Thammasat University in Bangkok they killed at least 46 people, effectively ending a brief period of democracy in Thailand.

    The brutal killings that took place on 6 October 1976 were quickly swept under the carpet and not investigated by the new military authorities or discussed for many years.

    Thongchai Winichakul was one of the student leaders on the campus. He spoke to Witness about the attack that haunts him to this day.

    Witness: The stories of our times told by the people who were there.

    bbc.com

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