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    • Kids Get Coronavirus, But Do They Spread It? We'll Find Out When Schools Reopen

    As scientists study the burden of COVID-19 around the globe, it's pretty clear that despite some cases of serious illness, kids tend to get infected with the coronavirus less often and have milder symptoms compared to adults.

    "It seems consistently, children do have lower rates of infection than adults," says Dr. Alison Tribble, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital at the University of Michigan.

    What's much less understood is the extent to which kids can spread the illness among themselves — or to the adults with whom they come in close contact.

    A lack of testing early in the pandemic has been part of the problem, says Dr. Judy Guzman-Cottrill, an infectious disease pediatrician at Oregon Health and Science University. "We need more robust epidemiologic studies to evaluate how children are part of the transmission chain," she says.

    Given the uncertainty, the decisions on how to safely reopen schools are tricky.

    "Kids don't seem to be super spreaders," says Dr. Aaron Carroll, a pediatrician at Indiana University School of Medicine. But, since most schools around the country closed in March as the virus began to circulate more widely, it's really an unanswered question.

    "Schools will now be the experiment," Carroll says. "We're going to see a bunch of schools open with varying levels of control, and then we will see what happens."

    There are a handful of preliminary studies from other countries that suggest there's less transmission of the virus from kids to adults or kids to other kids, especially among younger children.

    For instance, a study from Switzerland included children who were diagnosed with COVID-19 at a hospital in Geneva. Contact tracers identified the children's household contacts. They found that the child was the suspected spreader of the virus in only three of the 39 cases.

    Another analysis from Australia included nine students and nine adults, who were infected with the coronavirus and came into contact with more than 700 other students and more than 125 staff members. The researchers found that only two infections were known to be linked to these exposures.

    In a commentary published in Pediatrics, two pediatric infectious disease experts concluded that while these studies are "far from definitive, the [research] provides early reassurance that school-based transmission could be a manageable problem."

    However, as testing of children has increased, scientists are learning more. Just last week, a top health official in Victoria, Australia, cautioned that child-to-child transmission is "more apparent" than was previously understood, as more kids have started to be tested.

    Other recent research suggests that the age of children may be a factor. Data from contact tracing in South Korea suggest that older children are more likely to spread the virus to their close contacts compared to younger children, particularly in a home setting. Researchers analyzed thousands of contacts of about 5,700 coronavirus patients (from January through March of 2020), looking at the age of the first infected person in a household. In homes where the first person infected in a cluster was 10 to 19, about 19% of their household contacts got COVID-19. In contrast, only 5.3% of the household contacts of younger children aged 0 to 9 were known to be infected.

    And, adding to the concern, there are also some signs that reopening schools can increase the spread of the virus. For instance, researchers analyzed what happened after many students returned to school in Germany in late May. While rates of infection did not appear to increase among teachers and staff, the infection rate did increase among students. The study, which is released in pre-print, concludes that the increase may be attributed to the difficulty of social distancing when schools are at full capacity.

    But the returning students in this analysis encompassed a mix of grades including many older students. In contrast, the return of groups of younger students in Germany earlier in May did not seem to correspond with increased cases.

    Overall, it's difficult to tease out the specific effect of school closures since so many communities around the globe simultaneously took other steps aimed at slowing the spread of the virus, including stay-at-home advisories.

    But many experts agree that the rate of community spread is an important factor in determining whether to return to in-person instruction. The more widely the virus is circulating in a community, the riskier it is to open schools.

    "It is reassuring that in other countries that successfully did reopen schools, they didn't in general experience large outbreaks in their schools," says Anita Cicero, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

    But she points out that these countries that successfully reopened schools had low community transmission on the date they reopened.

    "For instance in Japan, South Korea, Finland and France, each of those countries had about 1 or fewer cases per 100,000 people when they reopened," she says. In contrast, there are currently some U.S counties with 80 or more new daily cases per 100,000.

    And while there's no standard metric for determining what rate of community spread is too high to have schools open, many epidemiologists say that when a county has more than 25 new cases a day per 100,000, the county is considered in the "red" zone and should consider shelter-in-place advisories, which would include keeping schools closed.

    "So we really need to be doing all we can to drive those numbers down so that we can return children to school buildings," Cicero says.

    Given the fact that the virus is still circulating widely in many areas of the U.S., experts say school reopening plans must include measures to safeguard students and teachers.

    "The way we can do this safely is really by having very strong plans laid out ahead of time as to how to essentially limit interactions," says Dr. Bill Miller, an epidemiologist and physician at Ohio State University.

    This is why many school plans call for pods or splitting classrooms into smaller groups to "make bubbles of kids," as Miller describes it, so that you're not crossing groups of kids across different classes. Limiting class sizes also makes social distancing more feasible.

    Overall, when it comes to opening schools, "I think the benefits outweigh the risks," Miller says. But, he cautions that many places in the country have infection rates that are spiraling upward. "So it's really going to take a lot of attention and caution, and at any point I think it would be appropriate to pull the trigger and say, no, we can't [open]," he says, or that we need to close schools again.

    To have the best chance of successfully remaining open, "schools should consider postponing bringing kids back into the classroom in regions where there is substantial community transmission of the virus," Cicero says.

    "This should be a national priority," she says, "It's measurably more important than reopening bars and restaurants.": https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...schools-reopen



    Underreported US death count: 144,958

    US Deaths………
    World War I - 53,402
    Korean War - 33,686
    Vietnam War - 47,424
    Gulf War – 149
    War in Afghanistan - 1,833
    Iraq War - 3,836

    Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 140,330

    Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
    it's been blown way out of proportion.
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

    Comment


    • Thailand - Hotels see low demand for 4-day weekend

      Hotels still face sluggish sentiment for the upcoming four-day weekend holiday, resulting from concern over the economic situation and complicated processes involved in the "We Travel Together" tourism stimulus measure.

      As the economy has decelerated because the majority of businesses were affected by the virus to different degrees, many people are now careful about spending on tourism, said La-Iad Bungsrithong, president of the Thai Hotels Association's (THA) northern chapter.

      Local tourists prefer road trips with family within a 300-kilometre radius from Bangkok rather than boarding a jet to more far-flung destinations such as Chiang Mai.

      For the long weekend, the occupancy rate for hotels in Chiang Mai is 25-26%, of the 30% of hotels that reopened.

      Most operators expect a 50% occupancy rate based on surging demand from the stimulus campaign.

      Mrs La-Iad hoped the occupancy rate may increase around 10-20% as local tourists tend to book at the last minute.

      While locals and private firms are lowering travel expenditure, state agencies will become the real push for an industry rebound soon, she said.

      However, hotels in Chiang Mai see few meetings and seminars from government authorities in July and August.

      Mrs La-Iad said the government should not open stimulus schemes to all unlicensed hotels, but rather limit them to those in the process of obtaining a licence.

      Related authorities should use this opportunity to crack down on illegal hotels, she said.

      Sasithorn Kittidhrakul, president of the Krabi Tourism Association, said the complicated process to join the stimulus scheme creates confusion among local travellers and operators, leading to slow bookings in the beginning.

      The government should find more appropriate channels to let everyone know about the measure and create better understanding, attracting more participation in the scheme, she said.

      For the upcoming long holiday, the average occupancy of hotels in Krabi was still 20%.

      Ms Sasithorn said many hotels plan to reopen in September when the weather is nicer and the school is on break.

      Small hotels with 20 rooms, villas or hotels that provide meeting facilities are now opening. Before the outbreak, Thai tourists made up only 25% of overall tourism in the province, so many hotels are waiting for international travellers to be allowed to return, she said.

      "State agencies are considered the last resort for operators," said Ms Sasithorn. "But we hope there's no monopoly on authorities going to specific hotels or destinations."

      Phisut Sae-Khu, president of THA's eastern chapter, said hotels in Pattaya are enjoying full bookings for July 26-27 and expect more bookings to fill in Saturday and Tuesday. Operators there remain concerned as the weekday average occupancy rate is only 10%.: https://www.bangkokpost.com/business...erbox#cxrecs_s

      Originally posted by Somchai Boonporn View Post
      Perhaps a blessing in disguise for the Golden Land.

      Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

      Comment


      • Midday update.

        Coronavirus Cases: 15,495,031

        Deaths: 632,490

        Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
        it's been blown way out of proportion.

        Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

        Comment


          • COMBINATION OF MASKS, HAND WASHING, SOCIAL DISTANCING STOPS COVID INFECTION: UTRECHT STUDY

          A combination of wearing a face mask, keeping 1.5 meters apart, and regularly washing your hands is enough to prevent another major coronavirus outbreak in the Netherlands and other western countries, according to a study by UMC Utrecht published in scientific journal PLOS Medicine.

          "Based on our results, we conclude that handwashing, mask-wearing, and social distancing adopted by disease-aware individuals can delay the epidemic peak, flatten the epidemic curve, and reduce the attack rate," the researchers concluded. "Given the high uncertainty around the efficacies of hand hygiene and mask-wearing on their own, the promotion of a combination of these measures might become preferable to recommending handwashing or mask-only measures."

          The study showed that face masks reduces spreading the virus from an infected person to an uninfected person, washing hands reduces the chance of becoming infected, and social distancing reduces the chance of coming into contact with the virus. "Each of these measures alone is not enough to prevent a major outbreak," Martin Bootsma, physicist and mathematician at UMC Utrecht's department of epidemiology and co-author of this study, said to AD. Together the measures can reduce infection enough to prevent another epidemic.

          The researchers made a mathematical model to predict the influence of a lockdown and personal prevention measures on the spread of the coronavirus. They found that even if prevention measures reduce the chance of transmission by only slightly more than half, that is enough to prevent a major epidemic. Without preventative measures, and as long as there is no vaccine or effective treatment, the number of infections will spike to a level that the healthcare system is overloaded.

          The number of coronavirus infections in the Netherlands increased significantly since measures were relaxed at the start of this month, making tourism and day trips more possible. Amsterdam, in particular, has been struggling with a very crowded Red Light District over weekends. The city is taking measures to manage the crowds, and along with Rotterdam, called on the government to consider implementing a mask obligation in public spaces. But according to Hubert Bruls, head of the Security Council, that would be unwise and impractical.

          Bootsma told AD that he is not calling for the mandatory use of masks in public spaces. "Our model shows that the risk of virus transmission does not have to be reduced to zero in order to have an effect. However, it has been established that the mandatory use of mouth masks reduces the risk of virus transmission. So use face masks if you have frequent contact with others, I would say. Like in public transport, or at a demonstration."

          Compliance with the coronavirus measures is becoming increasingly hard for people as this crisis stretches on. ​Despite this, Bootsma thinks that the Netherlands will not end up in a situation as dire as March and April again, with the coronavirus at least. "We now know much more about the virus spread. If citizens do not comply with the prevention measures, the government will intervene."

          The model is based on Dutch data on contact intensity in society. Because other Western countries have a similar contact structure, the study results can also apply to them, Bootsma said. He added that the model has some limitations, like travel behavior was not taken into account, neither was the contact between an infected person and their housemates.: https://nltimes.nl/2020/07/23/combin...-utrecht-study

          Afternoon update.


          Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
          it's been blown way out of proportion.
          Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

          Comment


            • Thailand - Bangkok condo price index declines in Q2

            The price index for condos in Greater Bangkok in the second quarter plunged for a second consecutive quarter as developers competed by offering massive discounts, says the Real Estate Information Center (REIC).

            Vichai Viratkapan, the centre's acting director-general, said developers cut sales prices of condos to attract buyers, with purchasing power weakened by the outbreak.

            "The lockdown caused closures and layoffs in many businesses, which had an impact on the purchasing power in the housing sector," he said.

            Developers offered discounts as high as 36% to drain stock, particularly completed, ready-to-transfer units.

            Townhouses were discounted up to 32%, while the maximum discount for single detached houses was 12%, said Mr Vichai.

            "If reductions trigger price wars, the impact may extend to the second-hand home market, which needs to lower unit prices to compete with new supply," he said.

            Lower prices in the second-hand home market will affect asset appraisal values from financial institutions, possibly causing lower credit lines for mortgages.

            The REIC said the price index of condos in Greater Bangkok dropped to 153.2 in the second quarter from 153.4 in the first quarter, though it gained 1.8% year-on-year.

            Mr Vichai said locations near BTS stations in Samut Prakan saw the largest drop on the condo price index as completed condos there offered heavy discounts.

            However, locations near new mass transit lines, including the Yellow and Orange lines, saw an increase on the index.

            Phattarachai Taweewong, associate director of research and communications at property consultant Colliers International Thailand, said the Ramkhamhaeng area where the Orange Line will run was an attractive location for condos because of limited supply.

            "New condo supply being launched at this location doesn't have to compete with existing supply as there are no new condo projects completed the past few years," said Mr Phattarachai.

            REIC reported single detached houses and townhouses in Greater Bangkok saw a quarter-on-quarter drop of 0.1% in the price index to 126.6 and 130.2, respectively, but rose 2.3% and 1.5% year-on-year.

            REIC also surveyed the sentiment of housing developers in Greater Bangkok in the second quarter and found the index was lower than the median (50.0) for the fifth consecutive quarter.

            Mr Vichai said developers' sentiment towards the property market remained negative, but their confidence was higher as lockdown restrictions were eased. Sentiment in the second quarter was 42.6, up from 41.2 in the first quarter.

            Sentiment of listed firms rose to 45.7 from 41.7, but that of non-listed developers fell sharply to 38.0 from 40.5.

            The expectation index rose marginally to 51.8 from 51.5, exceeding the median as they hope for a recovery in the property market over the next six months, said REIC. Though respondents were wary because of a possible second wave of the virus.

            Expectations of listed companies rose to 57.0 from 54.8, while those of non-listed firms fell to 44.1 from 46.4.: https://www.bangkokpost.com/business...declines-in-q2

            Originally posted by Somchai Boonporn View Post
            Perhaps a blessing in disguise for the Golden Land.


            Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

            Comment


            • Originally posted by S Landreth View Post
              • Kids Get Coronavirus, But Do They Spread It? We'll Find Out When Schools Reopen

              US Deaths………
              World War I - 53,402
              Korean War - 33,686
              Vietnam War - 47,424
              Gulf War – 149
              War in Afghanistan - 1,833
              Iraq War - 3,836

              Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 140,330
              How dare you post the number of US deaths as compared to the damage you have caused in SEA over the past decades, and the millions of deaths!

              You F*ckin piece of Shit


              Comment


              • McDonald's mandates face masks in all restaurants


                McDonald’s will now require customers to wear face masks or coverings when entering premises and ordering from one of their 14,000 nationwide restaurants starting on August 1.

                “The latest science suggests droplets have the potential to stay in the air for extended periods of time, increasing the risk of virus spread, especially from asymptomatic carriers,” its press release read. “While nearly 82% of our restaurants are in states or localities that require facial coverings for both crew and customers today, it’s important we protect the safety of all employees and customers,” the fast food behemoth continued.

                The American cultural icon is the latest chain store to require masks, with comparable outlets like Kroger, CVS, and Target mandating customers wear masks while on premises over the past few weeks.

                Heretofore, McDonald’s had required employees to wear face masks as well as customers in some locations, but now extends the same rules to all franchises. Other new public health requirements include the implementation of protective divider panels to the front and back of the restaurant operations to keep guests and staff socially distant.

                Before this happens, however, the chain will pause dining room operations for another 30 days to help reduce the transmission of the coronavirus from spreading in the restaurants. After this 30 day period, any dining room operating decision must be guided by state and local ordinances.

                “For 65 years, protecting the safety and comfort of employees and customers has been core to who we are. The moment we’re in today provides another opportunity to set the standard and lead,” the statement concluded.: https://thehill.com/changing-america...s-to-wear-face


                Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                it's been blown way out of proportion.

                Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                Comment


                • Late night update.

                  Underreported US death count: 148,490

                  US Deaths………

                  World War I - 53,402
                  Korean War - 33,686
                  Vietnam War - 47,424
                  Gulf War – 149
                  War in Afghanistan - 1,833
                  Iraq War - 3,836

                  Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 140,330

                  Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                  it's been blown way out of proportion.

                  Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                  Comment


                    • Thailand - Worst export figures in a decade

                    June exports were down 23.2% year-on-year, the lowest since July 2009, but the Commerce Ministry expects the situation to improve later this year.

                    Pimchanok Vonkorporn, director-general of trade policy and strategy, said on Friday that the US dollar valuen of June exports was $16.4 billion and imports came in at $14.8 billion, down 18.1%.

                    In the first half of this year, exports fell 7.1% to $114.3 billion and imports 12.6% to $103.6 billion. The country posted a trade surplus of $1.6 billion in June and $10.7 billion in the first half of 2020.

                    Last month agricultural and agro-industrial product shipment values decreased 9.9%. Some products still expanded favourably, including frozen and processed fruits and vegetables (+8.8%), canned and processed seafood (+21.4%), chilled, frozen, and processed chicken (+4.6%) and pet food (+21.2%).

                    Meanwhile, exports fell by 25.6% for rice, 55.6% for rubber, 5.8% for cassava products and 57.1% for sugar.

                    In the first half of 2020, exports of agricultural and agro-industrial products dropped by 2.1%.

                    Last month industrial exports decreased by 25.1%. Precious stones and jewellery (excluding gold) plunged by 70.1%, automobiles and parts by 43.2%, oil-related products 18.0% and gold 86%.

                    Shipments of semiconductors, transistors and diodes rose by 45%, computers and parts by 4.6%, rubber products 10.5% and furniture and parts 6.8%. In the first half of 2020, exports of industrial products declined by 7.5%.

                    In June, exports to China grew for the third consecutive month and exports to the United States expanded favourably. However, exports to other destinations dropped.

                    Ms Pimchanok said she believed exports would bottom out later this year because markets were picking up slowly. She predicted that exports would be down 8-9% for all of 2020.: https://www.bangkokpost.com/business...es-in-a-decade

                    Originally posted by Somchai Boonporn View Post
                    Perhaps a blessing in disguise for the Golden Land.
                    • Underreported US death count: 148,492

                    US Deaths………

                    American Revolutionary War - 8,000
                    World War I - 53,402
                    Korean War - 33,686
                    Vietnam War - 47,424
                    Gulf War – 149
                    War in Afghanistan - 1,833
                    Iraq War - 3,836

                    Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 148,330

                    Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                    it's been blown way out of proportion.

                    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                    Comment


                      • US surpasses 1,000 COVID-19 deaths for fourth straight day

                      The U.S. tallied over 1,000 coronavirus-related deaths Friday for the fourth straight day this week, yet another sign of the alarming spike in COVID-19 cases across the country.

                      There were 1,178 new deaths Friday alone, according to the COVID Tracking project, compared with 1,038 Tuesday, 1,117 Wednesday, and 1,039 Thursday. Over 137,000 people have died in the U.S. and over 4 million people have contracted the virus in the country since the outbreak began.

                      The alarming figures are largely driven by a surge in cases across the South and West, particularly in Arizona, California, Florida and Texas.

                      The spikes have led to urgent calls from public health officials for Americans, particularly young people, to heed health guidance such as wearing masks and socially distancing.: https://thehill.com/policy/healthcar...h-straight-day
                      • Underreported US death count: 149,045

                      US Deaths………

                      American Revolutionary War - 8,000
                      World War I - 53,402
                      Korean War - 33,686
                      Vietnam War - 47,424
                      Gulf War – 149
                      War in Afghanistan - 1,833
                      Iraq War - 3,836

                      Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 148,330

                      Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                      it's been blown way out of proportion.
                      Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                      Comment


                        • Early morning update.

                        Coronavirus Cases: 16,217,628

                        Deaths: 648,655

                        Underreported US death count: 149,398

                        US conflicts………

                        American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                        World War I - 53,402 deaths
                        Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                        Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                        Gulf War – 149 deaths
                        War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                        Iraq War - 3,836 deaths

                        Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 148,330

                        Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                        it's been blown way out of proportion.
                        Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                        Comment


                          • Study identifies six different "types" of COVID-19

                          A new study of COVID-19, based on data from a symptom tracker app, determined that there are six distinct "types" of the disease involving different clusters of symptoms. The discovery could potentially open new possibilities for how doctors can better treat individual patients and predict what level of hospital care they would need.

                          Researchers from King's College London studied data from approximately 1,600 U.K. and U.S. patients who regularly logged their symptoms in the COVID Symptom Tracker App in March and April.

                          Typically, doctors will look for key symptoms such as cough, fever and loss of the sense of smell to detect COVID-19. The study, which has not been peer-reviewed, says the six different "types" of COVID-19 can vary by severity and come with their own set of symptoms.

                          "I think it's very, very interesting," Dr. Bob Lahita, who is not affiliated with the study, told CBSN anchors Vladimir Duthiers and Anne-Marie Green. "Among the patients I see, those who recovered, many of them present different ways: some people with fever and some without fever, and some with nausea and vomiting, some people with diarrhea, etc."

                          The six clusters of symptoms outlined in the study are:

                          *Flu-like with no fever: Headache, loss of smell, muscle pains, cough, sore throat, chest pain, no fever.
                          *Flu-like with fever: Headache, loss of smell, cough, sore throat, hoarseness, fever, loss of appetite.
                          *Gastrointestinal: Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, diarrhea, sore throat, chest pain, no cough.
                          *Severe level one, fatigue: Headache, loss of smell, cough, fever, hoarseness, chest pain, fatigue.
                          *Severe level two, confusion: Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain.
                          *Severe level three, abdominal and respiratory: Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain, shortness of breath, diarrhea, abdominal pain.

                          The first level, "flu-like with no fever," is associated with headaches, loss of smell, muscle pains, cough, sore throat and chest pain. Patients at this level have a 1.5% chance of needing breathing support such as oxygen or a ventilator.

                          The second type, "flu-like with fever," includes symptoms like loss of appetite, headache, loss of smell, cough, sore throat, hoarseness and fever. Researchers say about 4.4% of patients at this level needed breathing support.

                          Patients with the third type, simply described as "gastrointestinal," do not have a cough as part of their illness. Instead, they experience headache, diarrhea, loss of smell, loss of appetite, sore throat and chest pain, and about 3.3% needed breathing support.

                          Lahita referred to the following three clusters of COVID-19 as the "really severe types."

                          In type four, or "severe level one," patients experience fatigue along with headache, loss of smell, cough, fever, hoarseness and chest pain. Patients at this level needed breathing support at a rate of 8.6%.

                          Type five, "severe level two," includes the symptoms of type four along with loss of appetite, sore throat and muscle pain, and is mainly distinguished by confusion.

                          "That means you don't know where you are or where you live, whether you are in or out of the hospital, who your relatives are," Lahita explained. "That is very scary." Almost 10% of patients at that level need breathing support.

                          The most severe type of COVID-19 is referred to as "severe level three, abdominal and respiratory," and has all the above symptoms along with abdominal pain, shortness of breath and diarrhea. Nearly 20% of these patients need breathing support.

                          "Those are the severe level threes who wind up on a ventilator, and then it is touch-and-go as to whether they survive the infection entirely," Lahita said.

                          The U.K. researchers also found that only 16% of patients with type one COVID-19 required hospitalization, compared with nearly half of the patients with type six.

                          Patients in the severe clusters also tended to be older or with pre-exisiting conditions and weakened immune systems, compared to those in the first three.

                          Scientists hope the discovery, once further studied, could help predict what types of care patients with COVID-19 might need, and give doctors the ability to predict which patients would fall into which category.

                          "I'm very happy that these six types have been identified and can give us an idea of a prognosis going forward for patients who are afflicted with this virus," Lahita said.


                          • Underreported US death count: 149,414

                          US conflicts………

                          American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                          World War I - 53,402 deaths
                          Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                          Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                          Gulf War – 149 deaths
                          War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                          Iraq War - 3,836 deaths

                          Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 148,330

                          Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                          it's been blown way out of proportion.
                          Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                          Comment


                          • Midday update.

                            Underreported US death count: 149,600

                            US conflicts………

                            American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                            World War I - 53,402 deaths
                            Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                            Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                            Gulf War – 149 deaths
                            War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                            Iraq War - 3,836 deaths

                            Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 148,330

                            Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                            it's been blown way out of proportion.

                            Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                            Comment


                            • Afternoon update.

                              Underreported US death count: 149,993

                              US conflicts………

                              American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                              World War I - 53,402 deaths
                              Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                              Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                              Gulf War – 149 deaths
                              War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                              Iraq War - 3,836 deaths

                              Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 148,330

                              Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                              it's been blown way out of proportion.

                              Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                              Comment


                                • Experimental Covid-19 vaccine is put to its biggest test/It will be months before results of the test can be concluded.

                                The biggest test yet of an experimental Covid-19 vaccine got underway Monday with the first of some 30,000 Americans rolling up their sleeves to receive shots created by the U.S. government as part of the all-out global race to stop the outbreak.

                                Final-stage testing of the vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., began with volunteers at various U.S. sites given either a real shot or a dummy without being told which.

                                It will be months before results trickle in, and there is no guarantee the vaccine will work against the scourge that has killed about 650,000 people around the world, including almost 150,000 in the U.S.

                                As if to underline how high the stakes are, there were more setbacks in efforts to contain the virus.

                                In Washington, the White House disclosed that national security adviser Robert O’Brien has the coronavirus — the highest-ranking U.S. official to test positive so far.

                                The move to restart the national pastime ran into trouble just five days into the long-delayed season: Two major league baseball games scheduled for Monday night were called off as the Miami Marlins coped with an outbreak — the Marlins’ home opener against the Baltimore Orioles, and the New York Yankees’ game in Philadelphia, where the Marlins used the clubhouse over the weekend.

                                On virus relief, Republicans on Capitol Hill planned to roll out a $1 trillion package that could include a new round of $,1200 stimulus checks but reduce the extra $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits that are expiring for millions of Americans this week.

                                In Europe, rising infections in Spain and other countries caused alarm only weeks after nations reopened their borders in hopes of reviving tourism. Over the weekend, Britain imposed a 14-day quarantine on travelers arriving from Spain, Norway ordered a 10-day quarantine for people returning from the entire Iberian peninsula, and France urged its citizens not to visit Spain’s Catalonia region.

                                In Binghamton, New York, nurse Melissa Harting received one of the first injections of the Moderna vaccine candidate. saying she was volunteering “to do my part to help out.”

                                “I’m excited,” Harting said. Especially with family members in front-line jobs that could expose them to the virus, she said, “doing our part to eradicate it is very important to me.”

                                The world is waiting on a coronavirus vaccine. We're tracking the global competition, the research and development, the rollout plan and how effective the vaccine will be.

                                After two doses, scientists will closely track which participants — those getting real shots, or a dummy — experience more infections as they go about their daily routines, especially in hard-hit areas where the virus still is spreading. Testing is planned at close to 90 sites, officials said.

                                “Unfortunately for the United States of America, we have plenty of infections right now” to get that answer, the government's top infectious-disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said recently.

                                Several other vaccines made by China and by Britain’s Oxford University began smaller final-stage tests in Brazil and other hard-hit countries earlier this month. But the U.S. requires its own tests of any vaccine that might be used in the country.

                                Every month through the fall, the government-funded Covid-19 Prevention Network will roll out a new study of a leading candidate, each with 30,000 volunteers, to test not only whether the shots work but whether they are safe.

                                The final U.S. study of the Oxford shot is set to begin in August, followed by a candidate from Johnson & Johnson in September and one from Novavax in October. Pfizer Inc. plans its own 30,000-person study this summer.

                                It normally takes years to create a vaccine from scratch, but scientists are setting speed records this time, spurred by knowledge that vaccination is the world’s best hope against the pandemic.

                                Governments around the world are already trying to stockpile millions of doses of the leading candidates so that immunizations can begin immediately if the vaccines win approval. But the first available doses will most likely be reserved for people at highest risk.

                                “We’re optimistic, cautiously optimistic” that the vaccine will work and that “toward the end of the year” there will be data to prove it, Dr. Stephen Hoge, president of Massachusetts-based Moderna, told a House subcommittee last week.: https://www.politico.com/news/2020/0...ne-test-382767



                                Underreported US death count: 150,444

                                US conflicts………

                                American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                                World War I - 53,402 deaths
                                Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                                Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                                Gulf War – 149 deaths
                                War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                                Iraq War - 3,836 deaths

                                Total US deaths in the conflicts above: 148,330

                                Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                                it's been blown way out of proportion.
                                Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                                Comment

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