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  • Afternoon update.

    Underreported US death count: 151,618

    US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

    American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
    World War I - 53,402 deaths
    Korean War - 33,686 deaths
    Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
    Gulf War – 149 deaths
    War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
    Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
    9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

    Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

    Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
    it's been blown way out of proportion.


    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

    Comment


      • Covid-19 infections leave an impact on the heart, raising concerns about lasting damage

      Two new studies from Germany paint a sobering picture of the toll that Covid-19 takes on the heart, raising the specter of long-term damage after people recover, even if their illness was not severe enough to require hospitalization.

      One study examined the cardiac MRIs of 100 people who had recovered from Covid-19 and compared them to heart images from 100 people who were similar but not infected with the virus. Their average age was 49 and two-thirds of the patients had recovered at home. More than two months later, infected patients were more likely to have troubling cardiac signs than people in the control group: 78 patients showed structural changes to their hearts, 76 had evidence of a biomarker signaling cardiac injury typically found after a heart attack, and 60 had signs of inflammation.

      These were relatively young, healthy patients who fell ill in the spring, Valentina Puntmann, who led the MRI study, pointed out in an interview. Many of them had just returned from ski vacations. None of them thought they had anything wrong with their hearts.

      “The fact that 78% of ‘recovered’ [patients] had evidence of ongoing heart involvement means that the heart is involved in a majority of patients, even if Covid-19 illness does not scream out with the classical heart symptoms, such as anginal chest pain,” she told STAT. She is a cardiologist at University Hospital Frankfurt. “In my view, the relatively clear onset of Covid-19 illness provides an opportunity to take proactive action and to look for heart involvement early.”

      The other study, which analyzed autopsy results from 39 people who died early in the pandemic and whose average age was 85, found high levels of the virus in the hearts of 24 patients.

      “We see signs of viral replication in those that are heavily infected,” Dirk Westermann, a cardiologist at the University Heart and Vascular Centre in Hamburg, said in an interview. “We don’t know the long-term consequences of the changes in gene expression yet. I know from other diseases that it’s obviously not good to have that increased level of inflammation.”

      Taken together, the two studies, published Monday in JAMA Cardiology, suggest that in many patients, Covid-19 could presage heart failure, a chronic, progressive condition in which the heart’s ability to pump blood throughout the body declines. It is too soon to say if the damage in patients recovering from Covid-19 is transient or permanent, but cardiologists are worried.

      “These are two studies that both suggest that being infected with Covid-19 carries a high likelihood of having some involvement of the heart. If not answering questions, [they] prompt important questions about what the cardiac aftermath is,” said Matthew Tomey, a cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System in New York. He was not involved in either study.

      “The question now is how long these changes persist,” he added. “Are these going to become chronic effects upon the heart or are these — we hope — temporary effects on cardiac function that will gradually improve over time?”

      Since the pandemic began, people with underlying cardiovascular problems such as high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, or heart failure have been known to be at higher risk for infection and death. The connection between Covid-19 and blood clots emerged later, after doctors began connecting the pulmonary embolisms, strokes, and heart attacks they were seeing to the virus.

      Cardiac problems in recovering patients could belong to a pattern of lingering symptoms. Tomey sees signs of weakness in patients who had Covid-19 in March or April, when the disease was surging in New York.

      “Patients come to my office saying, ‘Hey, I’m a 31-year-old who used to run and be completely unlimited in my exercise, and now I get palpitations walking across the street. Or I get out of breath climbing up to my second-floor apartment,’” he said. “Individuals are exquisitely tuned in to their own capacity for exercise, so I take that very seriously. Our challenge is to understand the why.”

      Marc Pfeffer, a cardiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, called both the autopsy and MRI studies a sobering warning. He was not involved in either. He’s concerned about relatively young people losing their cardiac health reserves, which typically decrease with age and can set the stage for heart failure.

      “We knew that this virus, SARS-CoV-2, doesn’t spare the heart,” he said. “We’re going to get a lot of people through the acute phase [but] I think there’s going to be a long-term price to pay.”

      In an editorial about the two studies, Clyde Yancy, a cardiologist at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine, and Gregg Fonarow, a cardiologist at UCLA’s Geffen School of Medicine, pushed for more research into the problem.

      “If this high rate of risk is confirmed, … then the crisis of COVID-19 will not abate but will instead shift to a new de novo incidence of heart failure and other chronic cardiovascular complications,” they wrote. “We are inclined to raise a new and very evident concern that cardiomyopathy and heart failure related to Covid-19 may potentially evolve as the natural history of this infection becomes clearer.”

      Asked if there is something that can be done for patients now, Mount Sinai’s Tomey said, “I would love to have the answer to that question.”: https://www.statnews.com/2020/07/27/...-heart-damage/
      • Underreported US death count: 152,320

      US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

      American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
      World War I - 53,402 deaths
      Korean War - 33,686 deaths
      Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
      Gulf War – 149 deaths
      War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
      Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
      9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

      Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

      Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
      it's been blown way out of proportion.

      Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

      Comment


      • Midday update.

        Underreported US death count: 152,868

        US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

        American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
        World War I - 53,402 deaths
        Korean War - 33,686 deaths
        Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
        Gulf War – 149 deaths
        War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
        Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
        9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

        Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

        Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
        it's been blown way out of proportion.

        Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

        Comment


          • Asia Facing Second Wave of Coronavirus As China Records Most Cases in a Single Day Since April

          Several countries across Asia are seeing a resurgence in coronavirus infections, with China recording its highest number of daily cases since April.

          China's National Health Commission reported 101 new COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, 98 of which were locally transmitted. Of these 98, 89 were recorded in the far western region of Xinjiang, where a new outbreak has occurred.

          The last time China reported more than 100 new infections in a single day was April 12, when 108 new cases were announced. Unlike the latest batch of infections, however, most of the April 12 cases were imported.

          The latest rises in mainland China came as Hong Kong announced new restrictions in an attempt to mitigate a rise in infections in the region, which confirmed 106 new cases on Tuesday.

          On Monday, Hong Kong—long seen as a success story for containing the virus—reported a record 145 new cases. This is significantly higher than the start of the month, when daily figures were hovering below 10.

          Hong Kong's leader, Carrie Lam, said on Tuesday the region was "on the verge of a large-scale community outbreak, which may lead to a collapse of our hospital system and cost lives, especially of the elderly."

          Lam urged residents to stay at home. New regulations came into force on Wednesday, banning gatherings of more than two people, making face masks mandatory and restricting restaurants to take-out service only.

          Meanwhile, Vietnam has reintroduced restrictions in the city of Da Nang after the first locally transmitted cases of the virus in the country since April were reported there.

          However, Da Nang—a popular domestic and international tourist spot—has reported around 30 new infections over the past five days. On Monday, the government began evacuating 80,000 people from the area.

          The government has now closed Da Nang to tourists for two weeks, while also urging residents to re-implement social distancing and close non-essential services.

          As of July 28, Asia has seen more than 3.9 million confirmed COVID-19 cases, with India, Iran and Pakistan reporting the highest numbers—1.4 million, 290,000 and 275,000 respectively.: https://www.newsweek.com/asia-facing...-april-1521265
          • Underreported US death count: 153,143

          US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

          American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
          World War I - 53,402 deaths
          Korean War - 33,686 deaths
          Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
          Gulf War – 149 deaths
          War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
          Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
          9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

          Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

          Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
          it's been blown way out of proportion.
          Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

          Comment


            • Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19

            If you're bitten or scratched by an animal with rabies, your doctor can give you a shot to prevent the virus from taking hold in you and causing an infection. The same concept is now being put to the test for the coronavirus.

            Most people who get sick with COVID-19 produce antibodies in their blood that seem to protect them from reinfection. A study is now underway to see whether an infusion of those antibodies can protect someone who has been exposed to the virus and is at high risk of infection.

            One of the first volunteers for this study is a physician who treats transplant patients at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Jonathan Orens had a close brush with the coronavirus involving not his work, but his family.

            His daughter from Los Angeles wanted to come home to be near her sister, who was about to give birth to her first baby. Orens says the traveling daughter was careful about protecting her health in Los Angeles and did everything she could think of to stay safe on her flight to Baltimore.

            "She wore a mask, she wore gloves, she had sanitizer, she had wipes," he says. "The load on the plane was relatively small." They chose the Fourth of July as a travel day, knowing that even fewer people were likely to be traveling that day. "We actually bought the two seats in the row to keep her away from everybody else."

            She wore masks through the airports and in the car ride back to her parents' house. Once there, she kept her distance from them.

            Just to be sure, about a week after she arrived, she and her parents went for coronavirus testing.

            Though she had no symptoms, "she was positive," Orens says. "And fortunately my wife and I were negative." But they were still at high risk of contracting the disease, given the close contact with their daughter.

            As luck would have it, one of Orens' colleagues at Hopkins was just starting a study to see if purified blood serum from people who have recovered from COVID-19 — called convalescent plasma — could prevent the disease in someone else. Orens and his wife, who are in their early 60s, are entering an age group at higher risk of serious disease if infected with the coronavirus. They signed up for the experimental treatment.

            Half the people in this clinical trial get an intravenous infusion of convalescent plasma, while the other half get an infusion of blood serum that had been donated before the pandemic emerged (so it lacked protective antibodies). Neither the participants nor the doctors treating them know who's getting what.

            The infusion took about an hour, Orens says. "I didn't feel anything except for the pinprick from the IV, and we went on our merry way."

            He now returns to the clinic for regular blood tests.

            "We'll follow him along to see if he develops symptoms and if he turns positive," says Dr. Shmuel Shoham, who is directing the study. Shoham says he plans to enroll up to 500 patients — though, in the best-case scenario, if the treatment is highly effective he won't need to study that many people.

            In addition to recruiting patients in Baltimore, "right now we have sites in Houston, sites in Alabama," Shoham says. "We're opening up additional sites in Dallas and Arizona. We have sites all over Southern California."

            He's also involved in a second study that looks at whether plasma will prevent serious illness in people who are infected but not sick. He says if both of these strategies work, they could help a lot of people, even in the absence of a vaccine.

            "That would give people a lot of confidence, I think, to go back to school, go back to work," he says, "because if somebody gets sick it's not a tragedy --because we can protect them and protect those around them."

            These studies are among a growing number of experiments involving convalescent plasma, both as preventive measures and as treatments for COVID-19.

            Dr. Jessica Justman at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York tried to launch a similar study this spring. Good news for New York — but a complication for her study — was that the disease had largely abated in the city, and she didn't have luck recruiting people to participate.

            "Compared to March and April, people have become less worried, less scared of COVID and perhaps a little bit less inclined to go for a preventive treatment," Justman says.

            That situation could turn around if the disease roars back in her area. And Justman says the idea is well worth pursuing. A similar strategy works against other diseases — not just rabies, but hepatitis B, botulism and a potentially serious viral infection in babies called respiratory syncytial virus. In fact, this general strategy dates back more than a century. Shohan was involved in a study that attempted to use convalescent serum to treat the flu, and it was not successful — so it isn't a cure-all.

            Piggybacking on this strategy, drug companies are gearing up to manufacture antibodies, instead of collecting blood from recovered patients. But those products — monoclonal antibodies — wouldn't be cheap.

            "What I like about the convalescent plasma idea is that if it worked, I see it as something that could really be scalable in resource-limited settings," Justman says, referring to developing countries where expensive pharmaceuticals are frequently out of reach. "And I think that's where convalescent plasma has this really great potential."

            As for the Orens family, nobody fell ill — whether that was due to in part to treatment or luck, nobody knows. Their quarantine period ended just in time for a quick trip to New York after the baby's birth to see the new mom.

            "The plan is to drive up after she is out of the hospital. Hopefully, everything will go well, and we will all be outside," Orens says. "We will see the baby from a distance. I've already been informed by my daughter that I am not allowed to get anywhere near the baby. And then we will turn around and come back to Baltimore."

            It's hardly the way he was hoping to greet his first grandchild, he says, "however it's the price we have to pay to bring this pandemic under control."

            The researchers in Baltimore hope to know by mid-September whether the convalescent plasma will in fact inoculate people from COVID-19.: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...ainst-covid-19


            • Underreported US death count: 153,840

            US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

            American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
            World War I - 53,402 deaths
            Korean War - 33,686 deaths
            Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
            Gulf War – 149 deaths
            War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
            Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
            9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

            Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

            Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
            it's been blown way out of proportion.
            Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

            Comment


            • Thailand - Covid-19 pandemic will significantly bring down value of Thai trade: UTCC

              The University of Thai Chamber of Commerce (UTCC)’s Centre for International Trade Studies has estimated that the Covid-19 pandemic will reduce the value of Thai trade by Bt423.05 billion to Bt1.02 trillion.

              The centre’s director Aat Pisanwanich said the industries most affected by the pandemic were automobiles, motorcycles and auto parts, whose values are estimated at between Bt129.36 billion and Bt314.619 billion.

              The other industries to be affected include electrical appliances and electronics, plastic, fuel, chemicals and food and beverages.

              Aat also said that the value of overall Thai exports during 2020 will stand at around US$222.74 billion (about Bt7 trillion), contracting by 9.6 per cent to 13.5 per cent, the lowest since 2009.

              He said exports in the first half of this year dropped by 7.1 per cent and is expected to hit 20 per cent in the worst-case scenario as the number of Covid-19 patients across the world continue rising daily and the demand of products from Thailand’s trade partners keeps dropping.

              Other factors affecting Thai exports are the China-India conflicts as well as the conflict between China, the US and Hong Kong, along with the upcoming US presidential elections.

              However, he said, the relaxing of lockdown measures in several countries is benefiting Thai exports.

              Aat said if a Covid-19 vaccine is successfully found in the third quarter, then Thai exports will contract by Bt423.05 billion, but if it is only found in the fourth quarter, then the value of Thai exports will drop by Bt729.246 billion.

              In the worst-case scenario of no vaccine being found this year, the centre estimates that Thailand will lose Bt1.028 trillion in export.

              The director, however, reckons that sales of some products such as processed food and beverages, seasoning, animal feed and rubber gloves may rise amid the pandemic.: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/...ernal_referral

              Originally posted by Somchai Boonporn View Post
              Perhaps a blessing in disguise for the Golden Land.


              Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

              Comment


                • US passes 150,000 coronavirus deaths amid fresh surge in cases

                The US has crossed the threshold of 150,000 confirmed deaths from Covid-19, just six months after the first cases were diagnosed in China and with the outbreak far from under control.

                The American death toll is the highest in the world by a significant margin and reached 150,034 on Wednesday, according to the Johns Hopkins University world coronavirus tracker.

                More than 4.3 million people have been infected with Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus Sars-CoV-2. As the summer has worn on, outbreaks have spread across America’s sun belt, the region from Florida to southern California, and look increasingly likely to spread into central states. Meanwhile, some early centers of the pandemic, such as New York City, have brought the virus under significantly more control.

                The pandemic has rewritten nearly every aspect of daily life in the United States. Economic activity depressed by public health restrictions and virus outbreaks brought the jobless rate above 11% in June. Restaurant, museum and cinema closures are rolling as states try to reopen, see outbreaks, and again restrict activities.

                Schools, once thought certain to reopen in the fall, are grappling with how to make buildings safe for teachers and students. This week, the nation’s second-largest teachers union authorized local strikes as a “last resort” bargaining chip when districts fail to put coronavirus safety measures in place.

                Meanwhile, many of the measures most fundamental to bringing the virus under control have continued to be challenges thanks to a fumbling and anemic federal response, led by the Trump administration.

                Widespread outbreaks and week-long delays in test results have undermined contact tracing. Those fundamental failures have had knock-on effects, as outbreaks have reached nursing homes and continued to fill intensive care units with the most vulnerable, ill and resource-intensive patients.

                As the coronavirus spread accelerated in March, and without federal leadership, state governors and hospitals began scrambling for ventilators and personal protective equipment such as masks, gloves and gowns for frontline medical workers, who were in many places short of supplies and who themselves began dying from Covid-19.: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...0000-us-deaths
                • Underreported US death count: 153,845

                US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

                American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                World War I - 53,402 deaths
                Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                Gulf War – 149 deaths
                War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
                9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

                Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

                Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                it's been blown way out of proportion.

                Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                Comment


                  • FDA opens door to rapid, at-home screening for COVID-19

                  The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday opened the door to COVID-19 testing that could be fast, cheap, and handled entirely at home — if companies don't find the rules too burdensome.

                  Routine screening of people who don't know they have COVID-19 could transform the fight against the disease.

                  "These types of tests will be a game-changer in our fight against COVID-19 and will be crucial as the nation looks toward reopening," FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn said in a statement announcing how the agency will approve at-home tests.

                  So far, the FDA hasn't allowed anyone to sell tests for at-home use.

                  Lab tests to detect the coronavirus are accurate, but they're often restricted to people who have COVID-19 symptoms. It often takes days to get results — by which point the person may have already infected others.

                  Other tests are fast, but so expensive they're unlikely to be used regularly. A clinic in Massachusetts, for example, charges $160 per rapid test; it's not covered by insurance.

                  With COVID-19, people are most contagious in the few days before they develop symptoms and as symptoms first develop.

                  Screening at home, maybe once or twice a week, would allow people to test themselves before going to work or school, getting on an airplane, attending an event, or visiting an elderly relative. Letting people know they are infectious in real-time would enable them to self-quarantine, and it would allow others to go about day-to-day life without risk of infecting others.

                  Several testing experts, including Dan Larremore of the University of Colorado, said the FDA's move is a step in the right direction and could encourage companies to pursue inexpensive, rapid, at-home tests.

                  But Dr. Michael Mina, an infectious disease epidemiologist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said the way the FDA's guidance template is written makes it less likely that such crucial tests will reach the general public.

                  The template spells out how a sample is to be collected and analyzed and how results are to be shown to a user without the need to send a sample to a lab for analysis.

                  The template also outlines how accurate the tests must be, with slightly lower standards than lab-based tests.

                  "The [required] software alone will pose an incredibly large hurdle for many," Mina said via email. "Unfortunately the template does not offer this type of ‘new’ avenue that I think is going to be necessary if we want to see truly $1 daily tests become a reality."

                  Mina said the standards should be lowered further. People are contagious only when there's an extremely high virus level in their body, which can be detected by a less sensitive test. An infection that goes undetected by a less-sensitive test would be caught a few days later when the person is tested again, he said. Or the person would already be on the way to recovery and probably wouldn't be contagious.

                  Similar rapid tests used to diagnose strep throat miss as many as one in five people who are infected, so physicians normally send a throat culture to a lab to confirm the diagnosis, said Dr. Emily Volk, president-elect of the College of American Pathologists. Such confirmatory testing usually takes several days.

                  If that were done with COVID-19, it could add to the delays of traditional testing rather than relieve them.

                  A race to create a fast, cheap COVID-19 test

                  There are several tests close to market that are fast and relatively cheap, but none meets Mina's vision: A rapid test that costs as little as $1 and can provide an answer before someone leaves the house in the morning.

                  The XPRIZE, a nonprofit that designs and hosts public competitions, announced Tuesday it would split a $5 million prize among five winners who can produce a test that delivers results in as little as 15 minutes and costs less than $15. The winners will also split $50 million intended for rapid manufacturing scale-up, said Jeff Huber, president and cofounder of OpenCovidScreen, whose company is launching the competition in collaboration with XPRIZE.


                  The competition is open until the end of August. About 200 semifinalists will be selected. They'll be winnowed to 20 finalists and then five winners.

                  Contenders will have to meet criteria that will speed up FDA approval. They'll get expert advice from large-scale testing companies, Huber said. The five winners will be ready to scale up manufacturing by the end of the year, he said.: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ts/5536528002/
                  • Underreported US death count: 153,848

                  US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

                  American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                  World War I - 53,402 deaths
                  Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                  Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                  Gulf War – 149 deaths
                  War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                  Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
                  9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

                  Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

                  Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                  it's been blown way out of proportion.
                  Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                  Comment


                    • Single Dose of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Demonstrates Robust Protection in Pre-clinical Studies

                    Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced that its lead vaccine candidate protected against infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in pre-clinical studies. The data, published in Nature, show the Company’s investigational adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) vector-based vaccine elicited a robust immune response as demonstrated by “neutralizing antibodies,” successfully preventing subsequent infection and providing complete or near-complete protection in the lungs from the virus in non-human primates (NHPs) in the pre-clinical study. Based on the strength of the data, a Phase 1/2a first-in-human clinical trial of the vaccine candidate, Ad26.COV2.S, in healthy volunteers, has now commenced in the United States and Belgium.

                    “We are excited to see these pre-clinical data because they show our SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidate generated a strong antibody response and provided protection with a single dose. The findings give us confidence as we progress our vaccine development and upscale manufacturing in parallel, having initiated a Phase 1/2a trial in July with the intention to move into a Phase 3 trial in September,” said Paul Stoffels, M.D., Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chief Scientific Officer, Johnson & Johnson.

                    The robust Janssen COVID-19 clinical trial program, including the Phase 1/2a clinical trial and the Phase 3 clinical trial program, will evaluate both one- and two-dose regimens of Ad26.COV2.S in parallel studies. The Phase 1/2a trial will evaluate the safety, reactogenicity (expected reactions to vaccination, such as swelling or soreness), and immunogenicity of Ad26.COV2.S in over 1,000 healthy adults aged 18 to 55 years, as well as adults aged 65 years and older. Planning also is underway for a Phase 2a study in the Netherlands, Spain and Germany and a Phase 1 study in Japan. For more information about these studies, please visit www.clinicaltrials.gov.

                    As the Company plans its COVID-19 Phase 3 clinical development program, discussions are underway with partners with the objective to start a pivotal Phase 3 clinical trial of the single vaccine dose versus placebo in September, pending the interim data of the Phase 1 and 2 trials and approval of regulators. Simultaneously, the Company also is planning to start a parallel Phase 3 clinical trial of a two-dose regimen versus placebo.

                    The Company also will emphasize representation of populations that have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic as it designs and implements its COVID-19 Phase 3 trial program. In the United States, this would include significant representation of Blacks, Hispanic/Latinx and participants over 65 years of age.

                    The pre-clinical studies were conducted by researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in collaboration with the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson and others as part of its ongoing collaboration to accelerate the development of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

                    Dan Barouch, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at BIDMC and the Ragon Institute, stated, “The pre-clinical data, generated in collaboration with the Johnson & Johnson team, highlights the potential of this SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidate. Moreover, the data suggest that antibody levels may serve as a biomarker for vaccine-mediated protection.”

                    In the studies, researchers first immunized the NHPs with a panel of vaccine prototypes, and then challenged them with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The scientists found that, of seven vaccine prototypes tested in the study, Ad26.COV2.S (referred to in the Nature article as Ad26-S.PP), elicited the highest levels of neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. The level of antibodies correlated with the level of protection, confirming previous observations and suggesting they could be a potential biomarker for vaccine-mediated protection. The six NHPs that received a single immunization with Ad26.COV2.S showed no detectable virus in the lower respiratory tract after exposure to SARS-CoV-2, and only one of six showed very low levels of the virus in a nasal swab at two time points.

                    “As we collectively battle this pandemic, we remain deeply committed to our goal of providing a safe and effective vaccine to the world. Our pre-clinical results give us reason to be optimistic as we initiate our first-in-human clinical trial, and we are excited to enter the next stage in our research and development toward a COVID-19 vaccine. We know that, if successful, this vaccine can be rapidly developed, produced on a large scale and delivered around the world,” said Mathai Mammen, M.D., Ph.D., Global Head, Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Johnson & Johnson.

                    The Company’s fundamental responsibility is to provide patients, consumers and healthcare providers with products that are as safe and effective as possible. Johnson & Johnson takes an evidence- and science-based, ethics- and values-driven approach to medical safety, putting patient and consumer wellbeing first and foremost in its decision making and actions, with an emphasis on transparency.

                    As Johnson & Johnson progresses the clinical development of SARS-CoV-2, the Company continues to increase manufacturing capacity and is in active discussions with global strategic partners to support worldwide access. Johnson & Johnson aims to meet its goal to supply more than one billion doses globally through the course of 2021, provided the vaccine is safe and effective.: https://orthospinenews.com/2020/07/3...nical-studies/
                    • Underreported US death count: 154,442

                    US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

                    American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                    World War I - 53,402 deaths
                    Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                    Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                    Gulf War – 149 deaths
                    War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                    Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
                    9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

                    Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

                    Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                    it's been blown way out of proportion.

                    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                    Comment


                    • Thailand - Banks tighten loan conditions as virus crisis deepens


                      Commercial banks are tightening their loan conditions as Covid-19 continues to take a severe toll on the economy.

                      Kiatnakin Bank said it is focusing more on customers’ capacity to make repayments, and was getting stricter in issuing all kinds of loans, particularly small ones.

                      The bank’s president Philip Chen Chong Tan said down payment for a car loan had been increased from 5 per cent to 10 per cent, adding that stricter screening of customers’ information and income was in place.

                      Kiatnakin Bank has also cut availability of loans for freelancers, though issuing criteria remain the same for salaried workers.

                      Likewise, the Bank of Ayudhya (BAY) is being more careful in issuing loans to both old and new customers. Old customers faced new limits on extending their credit line while new customers would find it harder to obtain loans, said Thakorn Piyapan, head of Krungsri Consumer.

                      Krungsri Consumer is also considering raising the salary threshold for loan applicants to Bt20,000 per month. Currently, customers need to earn at least Bt12,00 per month to obtain a personal loan and Bt15,000 to receive a credit card.

                      However, due to numerous conditions it would not be easy to change the criteria, he said.

                      At Siam Commercial Bank, president Apiphan Charoenanusorn said it had become more cautious about issuing loans to customers without collateral.

                      She added that fewer applicants were managing to obtain loans, since their incomes had dropped amid the crisis while the bank’s criteria remained unchanged.: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/...ernal_referral

                      Originally posted by Somchai Boonporn View Post
                      Perhaps a blessing in disguise for the Golden Land.

                      Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                      Comment


                      • Underreported US death count: 155,285

                        US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

                        American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                        World War I - 53,402 deaths
                        Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                        Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                        Gulf War – 149 deaths
                        War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                        Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
                        9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

                        Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

                        Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                        it's been blown way out of proportion.

                        Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                        Comment


                          • Study hints that young children may spread COVID-19 as easily as adults/Researchers found that kids carried as much virus in their noses as older children and adults.

                          Children under 5 can carry just as much of the coronavirus in their noses as older children and adults, researchers at Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago reported Thursday.

                          The study, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, raises the possibility that young kids may be able to spread COVID-19 as easily as adults, even if they aren't that sick.

                          Dr. Taylor Heald-Sargent, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Lurie Children's, and her colleagues analyzed data from the diagnostic tests of 145 COVID-19 patients who had mild to moderate cases of the illness. The tests look for pieces of the virus's RNA, or genetic code, to make a diagnosis.

                          The 145 patients were split into three groups: those under 5, those ages 5 to 17, and adults ages 18 to 65.

                          "Children had equal — if not more — viral RNA in their noses compared to older children and adults," Heald-Sargent said.

                          Compared to adults, the young kids had anywhere from 10 to 100 times the amount of viral RNA in their upper respiratory tract, the study authors wrote.

                          "This supports the idea that children are able to get infected and replicate virus and therefore shed and transmit virus just as much as older children and adults," she said, noting that more research is needed to confirm this.

                          Indeed, "you can have somebody who has high viral load in the nose, but that doesn't mean necessarily that they're going to spread more than somebody who has a little less," said Dr. Rick Malley, a senior physician in pediatrics in the division of infectious diseases at Boston Children's Hospital.

                          "We don't know that for sure," Malley, who was not involved with the new study, said.

                          Still, the findings add another layer to the complex question of whether schools should reopen their doors for the fall semester, and if so, how do to so safely.

                          "We don't have the evidence that children will play the same role with this virus as they do, say, with the flu virus, where it's pretty clear that kids with flu are main drivers of spread," Malley said.: https://www.nbcnews.com/health/healt...dults-n1235301
                          • Underreported US death count: 155,757

                          US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

                          American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                          World War I - 53,402 deaths
                          Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                          Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                          Gulf War – 149 deaths
                          War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                          Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
                          9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

                          Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

                          Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                          it's been blown way out of proportion.
                          Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                          Comment




                          • Underreported US death count: 156,764

                            US conflicts and 9/11 Casualties ………

                            American Revolutionary War - 8,000 deaths
                            World War I - 53,402 deaths
                            Korean War - 33,686 deaths
                            Vietnam War - 47,424 deaths
                            Gulf War – 149 deaths
                            War in Afghanistan - 1,833 deaths
                            Iraq War - 3,836 deaths
                            9/11 Casualties - 2,726 people

                            Total US deaths in the conflicts above and 9/11 Casualties: 151,288

                            Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                            it's been blown way out of proportion.
                            Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                            Comment


                            • The end is near for the U.S.

                              Kharma kinda thing.

                              Comment


                              • ^sure
                                Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                                Comment

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