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  • Coronavirus Cases: 33,272,001

    Deaths: 1,001,512

    Underreported US death count: 209,425

    American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

    Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
    it's been blown way out of proportion.

    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

    Comment




    • Coronavirus Cases: 33,303,209

      Deaths: 1,002,383

      Underreported US death count: 209,453

      American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

      Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
      it's been blown way out of proportion.
      Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

      Comment


      • Coronavirus Maps: How Severe Is Your State's Outbreak?



        https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...rus-in-the-u-s

        Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
        it's been blown way out of proportion.

        Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

        Comment


        • Coronavirus Cases: 33,332,252

          Deaths: 1,002,733

          Underreported US death count: 209,454

          American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

          Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
          it's been blown way out of proportion.

          Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

          Comment


          • Coronavirus Cases: 33,470,824

            Deaths: 1,004,639

            Underreported US death count: 209,582

            American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

            Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
            it's been blown way out of proportion.

            Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

            Comment


              • COVID-19 Patients Rarely Survive Cardiac Arrest: Study

              Folks whose hearts stop due to a severe case of COVID-19 are very unlikely to leave the hospital alive, a new study shows.

              Out of 54 patients at a Michigan hospital who suffered cardiac arrest while battling COVID-19, none survived their illness even though 29 were resuscitated by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the researchers reported.

              "I don't think we can say cardiac arrest is always fatal if you have COVID," said Dr. J. Randall Curtis, a professor of pulmonology with the University of Washington in Seattle, who was not involved in the study. "I think we can say in this setting of cardiac arrest and COVID, the chances of cardiac resuscitation working are very, very low."

              Doctors had suspected prior to this study that saving a COVID-19 patient whose heart stops would be difficult, Curtis said. A previous report from China had similar results.

              This sort of thing is common in other severe pulmonary diseases, with the problem coming not from the heart but from the lungs, Curtis said.

              "Of patients who have COVID and progress to have cardiac arrest, most of the time that is a cardiac arrest that is occurring because their lung disease has gotten so severe that they aren't getting enough oxygen and their body is shutting down," Curtis explained.

              Even if the heart is revived, it will continue to have to fight against a lack of oxygen from damaged lungs, Curtis said.

              Curtis noted that of the 54 patients, 52 had a type of cardiac arrest called pulseless electrical activity, or PEA. In PEA, the heart is generating enough electricity to create a heart beat, but the heart muscle itself has given out and will not contract.

              "PEA arrests have much worse hospital survival after an in-hospital cardiac arrest" than cardiac arrests caused by a dysfunction of the heart itself, Curtis said.

              The researchers, Dr. Shrinjaya Thapa and colleagues at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., suggested that doctors might want to think twice before performing prolonged CPR on these patients, especially because the resuscitation process generates aerosols that may place health care personnel at a higher risk of contracting the virus.

              Curtis agreed that CPR does increase the amount of virus in the air, but noted that most patients who are this ill with COVID-19 will already be in the intensive care unit and in isolation.

              "I feel like if we're going to do CPR, the risk is relatively low for hospital workers, because personal protective equipment that is properly donned and doffed works," Curtis said.

              These results, which were published online Sept. 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine, do highlight the need for doctors to have frank discussions with severely ill COVID-19 patients about their desires related to resuscitation, he noted. Curtis co-authored a commentary accompanying the research letter.

              "It's really important for us to think ahead of time about whether we should really put patients and families through this," Curtis said. "Talking ahead of time is really important. Many patients with such low chances of meaningful survival wouldn't want to be put through this.": https://www.usnews.com/news/health-n...c-arrest-study
              • Coronavirus Cases: 33,475,101

              Deaths: 1,004,665

              Underreported US death count: 209,601

              American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

              Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
              it's been blown way out of proportion.
              Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

              Comment


              • Coronavirus Cases: 33,514,808

                Deaths: 1,005,530

                Underreported US death count: 209,716

                American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

                Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                it's been blown way out of proportion.

                Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                Comment


                • World Bank: Economic recovery will take at least 2 years

                  The Thai economy will shrink at least 8.3% this year and take at least two years to return to its pre-Covid level, according to the World Bank.

                  However, recovery could be derailed by drought, flooding or a second wave of Covid-19, the bank warned,

                  Kiatipong Ariyapruchya, World Bank senior economist for Thailand, released the bank's economic update on East Asia and the Pacific on Tuesday.

                  He warned that a second wave of the coronavirus disease, plus drought and flooding, could cause the economy to shrink by up to 10.4% year-on-year this year, and recovery to the pre-Covid level could then take as long as three years.

                  A second wave of the disease would affect exports, tourism and the finance sector, and businesses would be again forced to shut down, like they did in March, he said.

                  Economic risks came from the unavailability of a Covid-19 vaccine, political uncertainty and the slow disbursement of government investment in infrastructure projects. Only half the investment budgets were disbursed, Mr Kiatipong said.

                  Birgit Hansl, World Bank manager for Thailand, said although economic stimulus planning was to spend the equivalent of 8-13% of gross domestic product, only 4% of GDP was actually injected into the economy.

                  The World Bank predicted the economy would grow by 3.5-4.9% next year.: https://www.bangkokpost.com/business...-least-2-years

                  Originally posted by Somchai Boonporn View Post
                  Perhaps a blessing in disguise for the Golden Land.

                  Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                  Comment


                    • Global coronavirus deaths rise above 'mind-numbing' million

                    The global coronavirus death toll surpassed a million on Tuesday, according to a Reuters tally, a bleak statistic in a pandemic that has devastated the global economy, overloaded health systems and turned daily life upside down.

                    The number of COVID-19 deaths this year is now double the number of people who die annually from malaria - and the death rate has increased in recent weeks as infections surge in several countries.

                    “Our world has reached an agonizing milestone,” U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said in a statement.

                    “It’s a mind-numbing figure. Yet we must never lose sight of each and every individual life. They were fathers and mothers, wives and husbands, brothers and sisters, friends and colleagues.”

                    It took just three months for COVID-19 deaths to double from half a million, an accelerating rate of fatalities since the first death was recorded in China in early January.

                    More than 5,400 people are dying around the world every 24 hours, according to Reuters calculations based on September averages, overwhelming funeral businesses and cemeteries.

                    That equates to about 226 people an hour, or one person every 16 seconds. In the time it takes to watch a 90-minute soccer match, 340 people die on average.

                    (Reuters interactive graphic: tmsnrt.rs/2VqS5PS)

                    “So many people have lost so many people and haven’t had the chance to say goodbye,” World Health Organization (WHO) spokeswoman Margaret Harris told a U.N. briefing in Geneva.

                    “...Many, many of the people who died died alone in medical circumstances where it’s a terribly difficult and lonely death.”

                    Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust global health charity, said the “unrecorded” death toll was much higher than a million.

                    “We must not forget that this pandemic is still accelerating and shows no signs of slowing down,” he said in a statement, calling for $35 billion in urgently needed contributions for the WHO’s ACT-Accelerator programme to back vaccines, treatments and diagnostics.

                    “We must do everything in our power to bring this pandemic, and all its harmful consequences, to an end as quickly as possible.”

                    INFECTIONS RISING
                    Experts remain concerned that the official figures for deaths significantly under-represent the real tally because of inadequate testing and the possibility of concealment by some countries.

                    The response to the pandemic has pitted proponents of health measures like lockdowns against those intent on sustaining politically sensitive economic growth, with approaches differing from country to country.

                    The United States, Brazil and India, which together account for nearly 45% of all COVID-19 deaths globally, have all lifted social distancing measures in recent weeks.

                    “The American people should anticipate that cases will rise in the days ahead,” U.S. Vice President Mike Pence warned on Monday. U.S. deaths stood at 205,132 and cases at 7.18 million by late Monday.

                    The United States, Indonesia, Bolivia, South Africa and Yemen have all had to locate new burial sites as cemeteries fill up.: https://www.reuters.com/article/heal...-idUSKBN26K08S
                    • Coronavirus Cases: 33,643,807

                    Deaths: 1,008,088

                    Underreported US death count: 210,082

                    American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

                    Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                    it's been blown way out of proportion.
                    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                    Comment


                    • Thailand - Cabinet approves B1.5tn borrowing next year

                      The government will borrow 1.5 trillion baht next year to counter the economic impact from the coronavirus pandemic amid dwindling state revenue.

                      A cabinet meeting chaired by Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha on Tuesday approved borrowing of 1.47 trillion baht in the fiscal year starting Oct 1, according to a government statement on Tuesday. The fund-raising is seen down 11% from a revised 1.66 trillion baht this year, official data show.

                      The borrowing will be used to finance various economic stimulus programs, budget deficit, infrastructure investments and bailout of some pandemic-hit state enterprises, the government said. The public debt-to-GDP ratio will widen to 57.23% in 2020-21, near the legal limit of 60%, it said.

                      Thailand’s government and the central bank jointly unveiled a 1.9-trillion-baht stimulus early this year to cushion the blow from the pandemic but has so far spent only about a third of the amount.

                      The central bank last week called for “more targeted and timely” government policies to support the recovery in the tourism and trade reliant economy, that’s on course for its worst-ever contraction.

                      Of the total, 387.4 billion baht will be used to repay existing debt under management, which totals 1.28 trillion baht.

                      With the government spending and borrowings running below planned levels this year, risks of an increase in full-year borrowings is only a tail risk, according to Radhika Rao, an economist at DBS Group Holdings Ltd in Singapore.

                      Thailand’s relative success in containing the pandemic curve has helped in the outperformance of its sovereign bonds with yields remaining largely stable and attracting haven flows, she said.
                      The cabinet also approved 291-billion-baht investment by 44 non-listed state enterprises next fiscal year, Rachada Dhnadirek, a government spokeswoman, said.

                      The government is targeting a disbursement rate of 95% of the budget, which will finance key projects such as the industrial estate in the Eastern Economic Corridor and the mass transit project in Phuket, she said.

                      The total investment of state enterprises, including eight publicly listed firms, will increase to 432 billion baht and is set to boost the economy, Ms Rachada said.

                      A series of stimulus measures meant to drive consumption in the fourth quarter may help contain the hit to Thailand’s growth this year, Finance Ministry’s Fiscal Policy Office Director-General Lavaron Sangsni said. The economy may contract less than the 8.5% predicted by the ministry and 7.8% estimated by the central bank, he said.: https://www.bangkokpost.com/business...erbox#cxrecs_s

                      Originally posted by Somchai Boonporn View Post
                      Perhaps a blessing in disguise for the Golden Land.

                      Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                      Comment


                        • Global coronavirus deaths pass 1m with no sign rate is slowing

                        The number of people who have died from Covid-19 has exceeded 1 million, according to a tally of cases maintained by Johns Hopkins University, with no sign the global death rate is slowing and infections on the rise again in countries that were thought to be controlling their outbreaks months ago.

                        The milestone was reached early on Tuesday morning UK time, nine months since authorities in China first announced the detection of a cluster of pneumonia cases with an unknown cause in the central Chinese city of Wuhan. The first recorded death, that of a 61-year-old man in a hospital in the city, came 12 days later.

                        So far there have been 1,000,555 deaths from Covid-19, according to the latest update to the database, which draws on information from the World Health Organization, the US and European centres for disease prevention and control and China’s national health authority, among other sources.

                        But the official figure probably underestimates the true total, a senior World Health Organization official said on Monday.

                        “If anything, the numbers currently reported probably represent an underestimate of those individuals who have either contracted Covid-19 or died as a cause of it,” Mike Ryan, the WHO’s top emergencies expert, told a briefing in Geneva.

                        “When you count anything, you can’t count it perfectly but I can assure you that the current numbers are likely an underestimate of the true toll of Covid.”

                        More than one-fifth of the tallied deaths have occurred in the US, the most of any country in the world, followed by more than 142,000 in Brazil and more than 95,000 in India, which is currently recording the most new cases per day.

                        The figure is only the known toll of a virus that may have already been spreading in the world, and killing people, before it was first identified in China in December. Studies from Italy have found traces of the virus in sewage samples taken the same month, while scientists in France have identified a case there on 27 December.

                        There is thought to be significant underreporting of deaths in many countries including Syria and Iran, either for political reasons or due to lack of capacity. Some countries report anyone who died with Covid-19 as a death from the virus, even if it is not thought to have been the direct cause, while even in developed countries, deaths from Covid-19 in the home may be less likely to be counted than those in hospitals.

                        “To some extent the quest for the true number of Covid-19 deaths is impossible,” said Gianluca Baio, a professor of statistics and health economics at University College London.

                        It might also not be so meaningful, he added. “The million figure is indicating a tragedy, it tells us a lot of people have died. But what’s crucial is not so much the actual number.

                        “The point is how many people have died from Covid-19 whose lives could have been extended. That’s the real number we have to investigate and come out on the other side of this pandemic with.”

                        Establishing the excess mortality figure would likely come much later, after the acute stage of the pandemic has ended and data could be collected and cleaned of as much uncertainty as possible, said Marta Blangiardo, a professor of biostatistics at Imperial College London.

                        “It is when all this information about cause-specific deaths becomes available, which can be months and months after the main event, that you can go back and try to disentangle the numbers.”

                        A study published on pre-print servers in July and yet to undergo peer review estimated 202,900 extra deaths across 17 countries between mid-February and the end of May, most in England, Wales, Italy and Spain. The confirmed global toll over the same period was fewer than 100,000 deaths.

                        Despite its imperfections, the recorded death count still paints a picture of a pandemic that escalated with astonishing speed from February and has not relented.

                        There were still fewer than 100 confirmed deaths per day at the beginning of March, mostly in China, the Johns Hopkins database shows. Over the following weeks rates appeared to explode in countries such as Spain, Italy and Iran, and throughout April an average of 6,400 deaths were being recorded around the world every day.

                        The fewest deaths per day since then were recorded in May with an average of 4,449 deaths and August the heaviest toll with 5,652 daily fatalities.

                        Evidence of long-term heart, lung and other issues among Covid-19 survivors is growing, but future estimates of the virus’s deadliness have fallen since the beginning of the outbreak, and would likely continue to do so, said Mark Woolhouse, a professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh.

                        “Almost invariably in the early stages of a pandemic, we overestimate, often by a lot, the ration of deaths to cases. We simply weren’t detecting [the mild cases]. We were seeing the tip of the iceberg, and it was the tip of the iceberg with the deaths in it.”

                        It was increasingly clear that fatalities from the virus “are hugely concentrated in a subset of 10 to 20% of the population: the elderly, frail and those with co-morbidities”, he said.

                        “Among that population the case fatality rate is much higher than the initial WHO estimate. It’s really high, but for the rest of the population it’s much lower. It’s down to what we might expect from an influenza, or even lower than that.”

                        A senior WHO official said last week that without concerted action to fight the virus the prospect of the death toll eventually reaching 2m was “very likely” before a vaccine was widely distributed.: https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...n-rate-slowing
                        • Coronavirus Cases: 33,758,844

                        Deaths: 1,010,097

                        Underreported US death count: 210,489

                        American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

                        Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                        it's been blown way out of proportion.
                        Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                        Comment


                        • Thailand - B3,000 freebie for 10 million/Co-payment scheme for the last quarter

                          The cabinet on Tuesday approved a scheme to make a co-payment of a maximum 3,000 baht per person for 10 million consumers over a three-month period.

                          The co-payment scheme, which is scheduled to be implemented from Oct 23 until Dec 31, is intended for Thai citizens aged 18 and above.

                          They need to sign up for the scheme from Oct 16 onwards.

                          The co-payment would subsidise half the price of the products, government spokesman Anucha Burapachaisri told the media at a briefing on Tuesday.

                          "The co-payment project doesn't apply to government lottery, alcoholic beverages, tobacco products and services," he clarified.

                          The maximum amount from the government will be limited to 150 baht per day and 3,000 baht per person throughout the period, he said.

                          Mr Anucha added that the amount will be transferred to the participants' electronic wallets.

                          The scheme would cost the exchequer 30 billion baht and about 100,000 shops run by small business operators would benefit from it, he said.

                          Shop owners interested in the project will be allowed to register from Thursday.

                          In addition to the co-payment plan, the cabinet on Tuesday gave the nod to a proposal to add another 1,500 baht to the monthly living allowance of 13.94 million state welfare cards holders.

                          Kanchana Tangpakon, a director of the Fiscal Policy Office, said the 1,500 baht living allowance will be paid in three installments of 500 baht a month from October until December.

                          The 1,500 baht is intended for buying consumer goods from the government's Thong Fa (Blue flag) shops across the country.

                          The latest cash splurge would add another 60 billion baht into the country's economy and is estimated to help lift gross domestic product (GDP) by 0.18%, he said.

                          In related news, the cabinet on Tuesday laid out additional specifications to a co-payment plan for companies which hire new graduates.

                          The government will extend help to companies that hire students, who work part-time to support themselves while studying and who have registered in the social security system.

                          The previous requirement was only that graduates who had not been under the social security scheme before could participate in the programme.

                          The employment subsidy programme targets 260,000 new graduates from universities and vocational institutes.

                          The scheme commits the government to pay 50% of the graduates' salaries.

                          The programme will last one year, starting next month, said Labour Minister Suchart Chomklin.

                          The budget for the programme will come from the 400 billion baht set aside to help the economy recover from the Covid-19 crisis and is also a part of the Finance Ministry's remit to borrow money to finance pandemic economic rehabilitation programmes, said Mr Suchart.: https://www.bangkokpost.com/thailand...for-10-million

                          Originally posted by Somchai Boonporn View Post
                          Perhaps a blessing in disguise for the Golden Land.

                          Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                          Comment


                            • 90 percent of coronavirus patients experience side effects after recovery, study finds

                            Results from a preliminary study out of South Korea shows 9 out of 10 coronavirus patients reported experiencing at least one side effect of the disease after recovery, Reuters reports.

                            An online survey of 965 recovered COVID-19 patients conducted by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency (KDCA) found more than 90 percent of respondents reported experiencing side effects associated with the disease, such as fatigue, loss of sense of taste and smell and psychological effects.

                            The survey found fatigue was the most common reported side effect, with 26 percent of recovered patients reporting experiencing tiredness, followed by difficulty in concentration.

                            KDCA officials said the study will soon be published with detailed analysis, according to Reuters.

                            The study comes as health officials are raising concerns about the long-term side effects of the virus that has infected more than 33 million people and left more than 1 million dead around the world.

                            During a congressional hearing last week, Anthony Fauci warned of a growing number of people experiencing health issues weeks, and in some cases even months, after they thought they’d beaten the disease.

                            “They’re referred to as long haulers,” Fauci, the director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said.

                            He said recovered patients have reported experiencing fatigue, myalgia, fever and the inability to concentrate. Many patients who have appeared to have recovered were found to also have inflammation of the heart.

                            As many as one in three COVID-19 patients may develop lingering symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.: https://thehill.com/changing-america...xperience-side
                            • Coronavirus Cases: 34,023,482

                            Deaths: 1,015,444

                            Underreported US death count: 211,209

                            American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

                            Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                            it's been blown way out of proportion.

                            Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                            Comment


                            • The childless vaccine

                              It'll likely be a long time before children are vaccinated against COVID-19, even though vaccinating kids could eventually play an integral role in reducing the virus' spread.

                              The big picture: None of the leading contenders in the U.S. are being tested for their effectiveness in children. Even once one of them gains authorization from the Food and Drug Administration, there will only be a limited number of available doses.

                              It's normal for vaccines to be tested on adults before being tested on children.

                              Why it matters: Children have a relatively low risk of severe coronavirus infections. But they can still spread the disease to more vulnerable adults. Vaccinating kids could play an integral role in reducing community spread, and of reopening schools.
                              • For now, the consensus is that those vulnerable adults — which could include teachers and school staff — will likely be able to get a vaccine early in the process. Eventually, though, vaccinating children would be helpful.
                              • "If you protect children, then you will reduce community spread and protect adults, so it's more of a herd immunity rather than a specific immunity question," explains John Moore, a professor of immunobiology at Weill Cornell Medical College. "If you need 70% protection in herd immunity, at some point you will need to include children in that."

                              What they're saying: Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, recently told Axios that her union would support requiring in-school teachers to take a COVID-19 vaccine, once one has been approved and is readily available.

                              A mandatory vaccine for kids would be a long way away — we'd need to have one before we could even consider mandating it — but would likely be controversial, as so many vaccines have become.
                              • "We don’t know if it's safe, or how kids will respond to it, so I can’t say next year that they definitely should get it," said Rhea Boyd, a pediatrician andpublic health advocate. "I don’t think we would require it in a year from now, and maybe not in five years from now.”

                              Regulators and vaccine developers will face a series of difficult decisions, once it comes time to start testing a vaccine in children — likely the first big controversy in this phase of the vaccine race.
                              • Move too fast, and parents will question whether the product is safe. Move too slow and the virus will be with us longer.
                              • "I think they’ll try to come up with a compromise that gives them some safety information in the minimal amount of time possible," says The Mayo Clinic's Rick Kennedy, who studies the development of immune responses after vaccination.

                              The bottom line: We know much less about a child vaccine than we do about an adult one, but do know that the ethical issues could prove even thornier.: https://www.axios.com/the-childless-...63f31c514.html
                              • Coronavirus Cases: 34,071,124

                              Deaths: 1,016,229

                              Underreported US death count: 211,406

                              American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

                              Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                              it's been blown way out of proportion.

                              Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                              Comment


                              • Coronavirus Cases: 34,140,749

                                Deaths: 1,018,064

                                Underreported US death count: 211,676

                                American Civil War Casualties (North and South) - 214,938

                                Originally posted by Boon Mee View Post
                                it's been blown way out of proportion.

                                Keep your friends close and your enemies closer

                                Comment

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