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Thread: Actresses, Business Leaders and Other Wealthy Parents Charged in U.S. College Entry Fraud

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    Thailand Lifer
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    Actresses, Business Leaders and Other Wealthy Parents Charged in U.S. College Entry Fraud

    A bit old of a story now, but last week this was breaking news..


    Actresses, Business Leaders and Other Wealthy Parents Charged in U.S. College Entry Fraud

    March 12, 2019

    Fifty people in six states were accused by the Justice Department on Tuesday of taking part in a major college admission scandal. They include Hollywood actresses, business leaders and elite college coaches.

    A teenage girl who did not play soccer magically became a star soccer recruit at Yale. Cost to her parents: $1.2 million. A high school boy eager to enroll at the University of Southern California was falsely deemed to have a learning disability so he could take his standardized test with a complicit proctor who would make sure he got the right score. Cost to his parents: at least $50,000. A student with no experience rowing won a spot on the U.S.C. crew team after a photograph of another person in a boat was submitted as evidence of her prowess. Her parents wired $200,000 into a special account.

    In a major college admissions scandal that laid bare the elaborate lengths some wealthy parents will go to get their children into competitive American universities, federal prosecutors charged 50 people on Tuesday in a brazen scheme to buy spots in the freshman classes at Yale, Stanford and other big-name schools.
    Thirty-three well-heeled parents were charged in the case, including Hollywood celebrities and prominent business leaders, and prosecutors said there could be additional indictments to come.

    Also implicated were top college athletic coaches, who were accused of accepting millions of dollars to help admit undeserving students to a wide variety of colleges, from the University of Texas at Austin to Wake Forest and Georgetown, by suggesting they were top athletes.
    The parents included the television star Lori Loughlin and her husband, the fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli; the actress Felicity Huffman; and William E. McGlashan Jr., a partner at the private equity firm TPG, officials said.

    Also implicated were top college athletic coaches, who were accused of accepting millions of dollars to help admit undeserving students to a wide variety of colleges, from the University of Texas at Austin to Wake Forest and Georgetown, by suggesting they were top athletes. The parents included the television star Lori Loughlin and her husband, the fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli; the actress Felicity Huffman; and William E. McGlashan Jr., a partner at the private equity firm TPG, officials said.

    The charges also underscored how college admissions have become so cutthroat and competitive that some have sought to break the rules. The authorities say the parents of some of the nation’s wealthiest and most privileged students sought to buy spots for their children at top universities, not only cheating the system, but potentially cheating other hard-working students out of a chance at a college education. In many of the cases, prosecutors said, the students were not aware that their parents were doctoring their test scores and lying to get them into school. Federal prosecutors did not charge any students or universities with wrongdoing.

    “The parents are the prime movers of this fraud,” Andrew E. Lelling, the United States attorney for the District of Massachusetts, said Tuesday during a news conference. Mr. Lelling said that those parents used their wealth to create a separate and unfair admissions process for their children.

    “The real victims in this case are the hardworking students” who were displaced in the admissions process by “far less qualified students and their families who simply bought their way in,” Mr. Lelling said.At the center of the sweeping financial crime and fraud case was William Singer, the founder of a college preparatory business called the Edge College & Career Network, also known as The Key. The authorities said Mr. Singer used The Key and its nonprofit arm, Key Worldwide Foundation, which is based in Newport Beach, Calif., to help students cheat on their standardized tests, and to pay bribes to the coaches who could get them into college with fake athletic credentials.

    Mr. Singer used The Key as a front, allowing parents to funnel money into an account without having to pay any federal taxes.
    Parents paid Mr. Singer about $25 million from 2011 until February 2019 to bribe coaches and university administrators to designate their children as recruited athletes, which effectively ensured their admission, according to the indictment.

    *This is a very long article, you can read the rest here.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/u...g-scandal.html

    It is amazing what money can buy, eh. This story actually makes me sick. I feel sorry for the young adults who are learning bad morals of bribery, entitlement, and fraud from their parents. I feel mad about the fact that they are stealing spots from young adults who work hard to get an opportunity to enter these elite schools. This reminds me of the state of disrepair the US is in... and sinking lower everyday.




  2. #2
    Thailand Lifer
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  3. #3
    Thailand Lifer
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    How Rick Singer started the college admissions cheating scandal? It began with a reality TV audition

    “This is a game,’’ he says on video submitted to a network in 2010. “Just realize that this is a game.”



    By JULIA SULEK | jsulek@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group
    PUBLISHED: March 20, 2019 at 11:34 am | UPDATED: March 20, 2019 at 2:34 pm


    Rick Singer looks straight into the camera, auditioning for his own reality show about the cutthroat world of college admissions.
    Wearing a light blue sweater vest, he pitches himself as a “life-coach” for families desperate to get their kids into Stanford, Yale and USC. He has the look of a tennis pro and a voice that could pass for New York “fixer” Michael Cohen.

    “This is a game,’’ he says on the production company video submitted to a network in 2010 and unearthed last week by TMZ . “Just realize that this is a game.”Parents are so stressed out, he says, they need medication to calm down. They are so rich, they send private planes to fly him across the country to meet with their children.


    Singer never became a TV star, but last week he became a felon — and the face of the biggest college admissions scandal in U.S. history.Over the last eight years, Singer exploited a crippling anxiety that every child and parent experience when they click open a college application: Sorry kid. You’re just not good enough.
    “Rick is a symptom of a system that has gone off the rails, from the college side and from the parents’ side,” said an old gym buddy from Sacramento who would listen to Singer’s braggadocio while sweating side-by-side on StairMasters. “It’s this whole vicious circle. The colleges are as much responsible for a Rick Singer personality being able to thrive as the parents are.”


    Just a year after William “Rick” Singer made that audition tape, federal prosecutors say he began his twisted scheme — seducing the wealthy parents of Silicon Valley, Beverly Hills and New York into paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to bribe test administrators and university coaches in hopes of guaranteeing their children’s acceptance to the country’s most prestigious universities. So how did he do it? How did this one-time high school basketball coach turn his legitimate college counseling business in suburban Sacramento into a criminal enterprise in Newport Beach, reeling $25 million into a bogus charitable foundation between 2011 and 2018?


    How could he convince university coaches and administrators to go along with his game, accepting personal bribes and dirty donations to their programs? And how could he persuade parents who are celebrities, private equity investors and winery owners that they would never be caught?

    In interviews with old friends, clients and competitors, plus a deep dive into the 204-page indictment issued Tuesday by federal prosecutors in Boston, a portrait emerges of a big-talking braggart quick to embellish his accomplishments and boast about the parents who hired him, becoming greedier the wealthier his clients became.Singer lured them all in with the language of a practiced cheat: Everybody’s doing it.

    “It’s really simple and easy,” Singer, 59, assures a New York parent, Gordon Caplan, last June in a phone call neither knew was wiretapped by the FBI. “They’re all families like yours.”He explained how he could set up a proctor to fix his daughter’s answers on her SAT test at a special center in West Hollywood. “It’s the home run of home runs,” Singer said“And it works?” Caplan asked.“Every time,” Singer said. According to the transcript, they both were laughing.

    https://www.ocregister.com/2019/03/2...ssions-system/




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