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Thread: Rohingya : rising evidence of genocide

  1. #21
    Thailand was dropped to the lowest level on the US State Department's Trafficking in Persons register earlier this year and is likely to remain on Tier 3 until it shows serious intent to deal with the issue.
    http://thailandchatter.com/showthrea...8TIP%29-Report

  2. #22
    Thailand to push back more than 200 boat people - police
    Amy Sawitta Lefevre

    BANGKOK, Nov 10 (Reuters) - More than 200 boat people held in southern Thailand will be pushed back out to sea, police said on Monday, despite calls by rights group to stop a policy that puts would-be asylum seekers at risk.

    Around 259 people were found at sea on Saturday and were arrested for illegal entry.

    Their discovery around 3 km (1.86 miles) from the coast follows what one NGO said was a "major maritime exodus" from neighbouring Myanmar of Rohingya, a mostly stateless Muslim minority group from the country's west.

    "On average around 900 people left by boat from the middle of last month. We saw a major maritime exodus of nearly 10,000 people," said Chris Lewa of the Arakan Project, a Rohingya advocacy group, adding that increasing desperation was one reason for the departures.

    Authorities in Thailand's Kapoe district said it was unclear whether any of the group were Rohingya but interviews with some of the group showed they were heading for Malaysia to find work or, in the women's' cases, join their husbands.

    The 259 will be put back on boats and sent back to Myanmar, said Police Colonel Sanya Prakobphol, head of Kapoe district police.

    "They are Muslims from Myanmar ... They are illegal migrants," Sanya told Reuters by telephone.

    "If they come in then we must push them back ... once they have crossed the sea border into Myanmar then that's considered pushing them back. What they do next is their problem."

    Tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims have fled Myanmar's Rakhine state since 2012, when violent clashes with ethnic Rakhine Buddhists killed hundreds and made about 140,000 homeless.

    Many were Rohingya, who now often live in apartheid-like conditions and have little or no access to jobs, schools or healthcare.

    The boats often sail from Myanmar and Bangladesh to Thailand where, as Reuters reported last year, human trafficking-gangs hold thousands of boat people in brutal jungle camps until relatives pay ransoms to secure their release.

    Testimonies from Bangladeshi and Rohingya survivors in an October Reuters Special Report provided evidence of a dramatic shift in human-trafficking tactics.

    Sanya said the 259 people were currently being held at a community hall and that his team were "looking after them like relatives" but that they would soon be put back on boats.

    "Who will feed them? I'm struggling day to day to feed them," said Sanya.

    "No country wants an outsider to come in to their house."

    Thailand was downgraded in June to the lowest category in the U.S. State Department's annual ranking of the world's worst human-trafficking centres, putting it in the same category as North Korea and the Central African Republic.

    The same month, the Thai military vowed to "prevent and suppress human trafficking", after having seized power from an elected government on May 22.

    trust.org

  3. #23
    Ranong villagers trained to 'push on Rohingya boat people'
    November 10, 2014

    Officials in Ranong have trained some 400 villagers to watch out for illegal Rohingya 'boat people' and told them to alert the authorities if they see anyone from the stateless ethnic group.

    The move is part of a project called "Andaman Guard". It aims to convince migrants on islands along the route from Myanmar to Thailand not to go ashore - by providing them food, medicine and fuel so they can continue to a third country.

    Ranong police captured 299 Rohingya - including 23 women and 13 children - in two round-ups this month, deputy provincial chief Pol Colonel Kritsak Sungmulnak said.

    nationmultimedia.com

  4. #24
    Thailand Lifer
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    Thailand was dropped to the lowest level on the US State Department's Trafficking in Persons register earlier this year and is likely to remain on Tier 3 until it shows serious intent to deal with the issue.
    That's as it maybe but why does Thailand have an obligation towards the Rohingya. Naively I will assume that if they are clean living, hard working, tax paying individuals they would be welcome anywhere. If they stick strictly to Islamic faith and values then Aceh should welcome them. But as always economics comes into play. If there are insufficient jobs and housing for the Acehanise then they don't want thousands of migrants. If the Rohingya wanted to settle in Buddhist Burma then they should have adopted Buddhism, as Burma at that time did not obviously have freedom of religion.

    There must be something wrong as even Islamic Bangladesh doesn't want them. What needs to be addressed is the root case. Politically unpleasant as it maybe.

  5. #25
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    Don't need a real good reason to hate a race, a faith religion football team fan, mods and rockers, Us Western sort have been very good at that. Everyone is a threat.

  6. #26
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    A muslim perspective. The issue of statelessness is all too familiar to Muslims who have for generations witnessed the suffering of Palestinians under Israeli occupation. Yet, in some ways, the Rohingya do not even enjoy the modicum of civil rights afforded to the Palestinians. Since the approximately 800,000 Rohingya living in Myanmar are denied citizenship status by the military government, their land is routinely confiscated, their children are denied any education beyond what they internally receive within the community, adults are denied the opportunity to look for work outside their village, and they can't even marry without getting authorization to do so. As David Camroux, a top commentator on Islam in Asia, succinctly put it: “The Rohingya are the Roma of Asia, nobody respects their human rights.”

    Whole article here: http://muslimmatters.org/2012/07/27/...he-rohingya-2/

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Voɔɒlnɘɒl View Post
    That's as it maybe but why does Thailand have an obligation towards the Rohingya. Naively I will assume that if they are clean living, hard working, tax paying individuals they would be welcome anywhere. If they stick strictly to Islamic faith and values then Aceh should welcome them. But as always economics comes into play. If there are insufficient jobs and housing for the Acehanise then they don't want thousands of migrants. If the Rohingya wanted to settle in Buddhist Burma then they should have adopted Buddhism, as Burma at that time did not obviously have freedom of religion.

    There must be something wrong as even Islamic Bangladesh doesn't want them. What needs to be addressed is the root case. Politically unpleasant as it maybe.
    The Rohingya are refugees, both political and social . . . and nowhere does religion come into it, therefore your point about ' If they stick strictly to Islamic faith and values then Aceh should welcome them' isn't valid, nor is 'If the Rohingya wanted to settle in Buddhist Burma then they should have adopted Buddhism' as the area where the Rohyngia reside in Myanmar is on the border with Bangla Desh.

    This argument on your part would mean that Australia/Germany, the US, France, NZ etc... should only accept refugees if they convert to Christianity.

    ' if they are clean living, hard working, tax paying individuals they would be welcome anywhere' . . . they are refugees, not migrants. There is a massive difference.

    You are absolutely right, of course, in that the root cause needs to be addressed - in this case that would be the discriminatory practices of the Burmese government (and the much lauded Aung San Suu Kyi has done sweet FA to help them).

    Another point, though, is that if they arrive by sea then there are a whole slew of agreements and conventions that Thailand should/must accept them, take them in and treat them humanely, irrespective of whether they are Buddhist, Muslim, Christian, Hindu etc...

    Here are a few:

    constrained in its actions against unauthorised boat arrivals that breach domestic immigration law by two key international conventions—UNCLOS and the Refugee Convention.28
    There are also other rules of law appropriate for consideration in the analysis of illegal immigration
    issues such as the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT) 1969, the International
    Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (ICMSR) 1979, Australia’s Migration Act 1958 and

    the Acts Interpretation Act (AIA) 1901
    and

    The fi rst is Article 1 which defines a refugee as a person who …owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the
    country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the
    protection of that country; or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of his
    former habitual residence as a result of such events, is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to return to it.33 The second is the principle of non-refoulement articulated by Article 33, according to which a refugee cannot be expelled or returned by a state in any manner whatsoever to the frontiers of territories where his life or freedom would be threatened.34 Article 31 covers refugees unlawfully in the country of refuge who may not have penalties imposed upon them on account of their illegal entry as long as they present themselves without delay to the authorities.
    Australia is battling the law as it stands on the grounds that human trafficking is exempt from these conventions . . . with little success.

    So, yes. Thailand does have an obligation to shelter and feed refugees.

  8. #28
    Thailand urged not to deport Myanmar boatpeople
    November 11, 2014

    BANGKOK (AFP) - The United Nations said Tuesday it had urged Thai authorities against deporting more than 200 Muslim boatpeople from Myanmar being held in southern Thailand after they were intercepted en route to Malaysia.

    Thai police arrested 259 people on an island off the southern province of Ranong Saturday, days after activists reported a surge in the number of stateless Rohingya Muslims fleeing Myanmar’s restive Rakhine state.

    "We’re seeking details from the authorities and appealing for them not to deport the group to a place where their lives or freedom could be threatened," said Vivian Tan, a spokeswoman for the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) in Bangkok.

    nationmultimedia.com

  9. #29
    Trafficking Rebellion Grows: Bangkok Sends Investigators to Probe Thailand's Trade in Boatpeople
    Chutima Sidasathian in Kaper and Alan Morison on Phuket
    Tuesday, November 11, 2014


    A man in Kaper with a neckband indicating he'd been sold to a ''broker''

    KAPER: Checkpoints have been set up by anti-human trafficking officials on the main road towards Phuket to ensure hundreds of boatpeople, arrested at the weekend, are not suddenly trucked south to Thailand's notorious secret border jungle camps.

    The checkpoints, manned by staff of the district chief of Takuapa, represent the new mood of resistance by some residents along the Andaman Sea to the inhumane trade in people that has flourished down Thailand's western coast over the past five years.

    These people want to end the brutality, the rapes and the deaths that have been occurring in hidden camps along the Thai-Malaysia border, destroying the lives of Rohingya and with them, Thailand's reputation.

    Later today, officials from the Department of Special Investigation and the Army's Internal Security Operations Command from Bangkok will begin a probe into whether human trafficking is flourishing along Thailand's Andaman coast, especially in the provinces of Ranong and Phang Nga.

    Activists and officials from Phang Nga say that some of the seven men arrested with the latest 256 boatpeople in Ranong were previously arrested just days ago in Phang Nga and charged with trafficking 134 Rohingya and Bangladeshi boatpeople.

    How these men came to be free and working with another load of boatpeople so soon will be among the questions being asked by the senior DSI and ISOC investigators due to arrive on Tuesday from the capital.

    That the issue is finally being investigated is a measure of the scale of the people's uprising taking place against covert human trafficking in Thailand.

    Led by Takuapa district chief Manit Pleantong, the Christian, Buddhist and Muslim activists are railing against the way that boatpeople are quickly processed by local police as ''illegal migrants,'' feeding the trade in people that has brought Thailand's reputation into disrepute.

    The anti-traffickers from the province of Phang Nga have moved north into the neighboring province of Ranong, where others are now coming to realise that perhaps the activists and volunteers have a point.

    The 256 men, women and children apprehended at the weekend are still in the community hall at the township of Kaper, where they were processed with speed at the weekend and declared to be ''illegal migrants.''

    There was talk of putting them all back to sea immediately, even though some of the women appeared exhausted and too sick to travel, especially into the storm gripping the coast at the time.

    Now it seems that authorities in Bangkok are reacting.

    It's not possible to say conclusively without thorough questioning whether the latest boatload of men, women and children to arrive in Thailand are trafficking victims.

    But without a sensible policy in place, it's plain that boatpeople have been traded along the coast for some years, in growing numbers, to the benefit of traffickers.

    Halting the horrific trade requires Thailand to implement a policy and provide a budget that removes the traffickers from the process.

    A Phuketwan reporter came through a checkpoint, set up in Kuraburi, not far from Takuapa, late last night.

    A torch was shone into the vehicle and the driver was asked to declare how many people he was carrying as passengers.

    Over the past five years, not very many torches have been shone into vehicles at checkpoints on the roads south and north.

    Few questions have been asked as newly-arrived boatpeople have been trucked directly to the horror of the secret southern camps, or north to the Thai-Burma border to be ''deported'' to traffickers so they could try to reach sanctuary in Malaysia by sea all over again.

    phuketwan.com

  10. #30

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