Page 1 of 11 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 103

Thread: Thailand murders: Two men found guilty and face death for UK killings

  1. #1
    Thailand Lifer Delayed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Ocean Cruising
    Posts
    1,897

    Thailand murders: Two men found guilty and face death for UK killings

    Thai Justice System Proves it is pre Stone age

    Thailand murders: Two men found guilty and face death for UK killings

    24 December 2015

    Two Burmese men have been found guilty and sentenced to death for murdering two UK tourists in Thailand last year.


    Zaw Lin and Wai Phyo killed Hannah Witheridge, 23, from Norfolk, and David Miller, 24, from Jersey, judges said.

    The backpackers' bodies were found on a Koh Tao island beach in September 2014.

    The defendants' lawyers say they will appeal. The accused retracted their initial confessions, saying police had tortured them.

    Mr Miller's brother said justice had now "been delivered".

    Miss Witheridge's family said they needed time "to digest the outcome of the trial verdict".

    At a Thai court in Koh Samui, three judges found the two bar workers - who were migrants from Myanmar - guilty of murder and ordered they face the death penalty.

    Miss Witheridge and Mr Miller were found on a beach having been bludgeoned to death, and a post-mortem examination showed Miss Witheridge had been raped.

    Prosecutors said DNA evidence collected from cigarette butts, a condom and the bodies of the victims, linked Lin and Phyo to the deaths.

    The investigation has been a muddled affair.

    The first officers on the scene were local police with apparently no idea how to seal off a crime scene.

    Thailand forensic scientist Dr Pornthip Rojanasunand, whose institute was not allowed any involvement in the investigation, testified the crime scene had been poorly managed and evidence improperly collected.

    Other flaws exposed during the trial included the police's failure to test Miss Witheridge's clothes or the alleged murder weapon for DNA.

    The key question though, hung over one piece of evidence that did tie the defendants to the crime: the alleged match between their DNA and that recovered from semen found on Miss Witheridge's body.

    The date of the original DNA analysis was said to have been 17 September, but the report submitted to court was dated 5 October - two days after police had announced a positive match. That unexplained discrepancy inevitably raises suspicion that perhaps the result was manipulated.

    Lawys defending the accused argued DNA from a garden hoe - allegedly used as the murder weapon - did not match samples taken from the men.

    They also claimed evidence had been mishandled by police and the pair's confessions were the result of "systematic abuse" of migrants in the area.

    Andy Hall, international affairs adviser for Migrant Worker Rights Network, which represented the men, said: "We strongly disagree with the decision of the court. This investigation was a shambles from the beginning.

    "The defence team have had access to all the information in this case and the information we saw did not comply with international standards."

    He said the defence team would mount an appeal in the case.

    The victims remembered

    Having earned a degree with first-class honours from the University of East Anglia she was working towards a masters degree in speech and language therapy in Essex. Her parents Tony and Sue, brother Paul and sisters Tania and Laura, described her as a "fun, vibrant and beautiful young woman" who had a love for animals.

    The University of Essex has introduced an award for outstanding excellence in clinical placements in her memory. She "would have gone on to make a significant difference to the lives of many people", her family said.

    Image copyright Miller family David Miller, 24, from Jersey, had just completed a civil and structural engineering degree at the University of Leeds. He was described as a "bright, young man and a talented artist".

    His friends and family held a memorial and commissioned a "simple seat from a plank of oak from a tree that fell in the great storm of 1987... This tree was another tower of Jersey strength brought crashing down before its time", they said.

    His parents, Ian and Susan, and his brother Michael said: "Our 24 years of memories and his beaming smile will always be cherished. David was intelligent, hard-working, he was caring, inclusive, enthusiastic and fun. He irreplaceable to us."

    The victims met on Koh Tao while staying in the same hotel.

    The family of Mr Miller attended the hearing but relatives of Miss Witheridge did not travel to Thailand for the verdicts.

    Her family said the verdict had left them "in the path of a whirlwind of emotions and difficulties".

    In a statement they said: "The past year has served as an unimaginably impossible time for our family. We have found the trial process extremely difficult and our trips out to Thailand, to attend court, made for particularly distressing experiences.

    "We found listening to proceedings very challenging and we have had to endure a lot of painful and confusing information. We now need time, as a family, to digest the outcome of the trial and figure out the most appropriate way to tell our story."

    Speaking outside court, Mr Miller's brother Michael said: "We believe the result today represents justice for David and Hannah.

    "It is our opinion that the evidence against Wai Phyo and Zaw Lin is absolutely overwhelming. They raped to satisfy their selfish desires and murdered to cover up that fact. They have shown no remorse during the trial."

    He said the Thai police investigation was "not the so-called shambles it was made out to be".

    "We saw images of two innocent-looking men surrounded by tough policemen. It was easy to conclude they might be convenient scapegoats.

    "We believe that, after a difficult start, the Royal Thai police conducted a methodical and thorough investigation."

    He added: "We hope the campaigners who have relentlessly promoted this case will respect the process of law and the decision of the court.

    "[David] was hacked down from behind, dragged into the sea and left to die. That will live with us forever," he said.

    He also paid tribute to relatives of Miss Witheridge for the "horrors they are also enduring with such dignity".

    "Our lives have been changed forever."

    bbc.com


    Sorry I know this story has its own thread but it makes me so angry that the farce continues. So who will come to the latest victims of Thai pride?????
    Last edited by Mid; 12-27-2015 at 02:30 PM. Reason: formatting

  2. #2
    Thailand backpacker murders: Amnesty International calls for independent inquiry into torture claims
    Andy Lines
    25 Dec 2015

    The family of victim David Miller described the long-awaited verdict, delivered at a court on the island of Koh Samui, as "justice" but Amnesty says question marks remain

    Amnesty International have called for an independent inquiry into allegations the men sentenced to death for killing two British backpackers had been tortured.

    Zaw Lin and Wai Phyo are now shackled in their cell for 24 hours a day after being convicted of killing Hannah Witheridge and David Miller.

    But the Burmese bar workers both continued to protest their innocence.

    Amnesty insisted an investigation was required into the claims that the pair, both 22, were brutally tortured to get them to confess.

    Campaigners visited them in jail today as they instructed their lawyers to appeal. If the appeal fails they will be executed for the horrific murders.

    Protesters gathered in their home country chanting in English: “We want justice.”


    Looming: Myanmar nationals Zaw Lin (left) and Win Zaw Tun (centre right) are escorted out of court following their death sentence Getty Images

    Human rights activist Andy Hall tweeted: “Some of support team on Koh Samui just finished a prison visit with Zaw Lin/Wai Phyo.
    “Both guys now shackled and confined to their cell 24/7.

    “The support team reported back from Samui Prison that Zaw Lin/Wai Phyo in good health and seemed to be taking the verdict in their stride.

    “Zaw Lin/Wai Phyo today stressed again they are confident during appeals process truth will out, they will be found not guilty and released.”

    Hannah, 23, from Hemsby, Norfolk and David, 24, from Jersey were found bludgeoned to death on a beach on the Thai island of Koh Tao in September last year.

    After several days the Burmese men were arrested but there have been widespread concerns from human rights protestors who claimed they were tortured.


    Murdered: Hannah Witheridge
    PA

    Champa Patel, Amnesty International’s director for south-east Asia, said the torture claims required an independent investigation.

    He said: “The Thai police force has a long and disturbing track record of using torture and other forms of ill-treatment to extract ‘confessions’.

    “This is far from an isolated case. The Thai authorities must start taking concrete steps to stamp out torture, not just paying lip service to doing so.”

    Around 1,000 people gathered in front of the Thai embassy in Yangon calling for the two to be freed.


    Murdered: David Miller
    PA

    Dozens of police stood guard outside the embassy and closed a lane in front of the building.

    Some protesters held signs saying: “Shameless Thailand government” while others shouted “We want justice” in English.

    But standing outside court in Koh Samui shortly after the verdict Mr Miller’s brother Michael said justice had “been delivered” and described the evidence against Lin and Phyo as “absolutely overwhelming”.

    The killings sullied Thailand’s reputation as a happy-go-lucky tourist destination and raised questions over its justice system and its treatment of migrant workers.

    The verdict followed a trial that saw prosecutors build much of their case around DNA evidence that police said linked the two migrant workers to the crime.


    Grief: Family members of David Miller speak to the media after hearing the verdict
    REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

    Defence lawyers argued that police had mishandled the DNA evidence and that the two men were tortured while in detention.

    Some activists have argued that the defendants were scapegoats and that the case highlights Thailand’s ill treatment of migrant workers.

    Thailand hosts about 2.5 million migrants from its poorer neighbour.

    Many work in the fishing and construction industry or as domestic helpers or cleaners in hotels and restaurants.

    mirror.co.uk

  3. #3
    Death sentence for Myanmar men prompts protest at "shameless" Thais
    HNIN YADANA ZAW AND AMY SAWITTA LEFEVRE
    December 26 2015


    Zaw Lin (left) and Win Zaw Htun (right) have been sentenced to death over the murders of British backpackers David Miller and Hannah Witheridge on the Thai island of Koh Tao in 2014.
    TAYLOR WEIDMAN/GETTY IMAGES

    Hundreds called for the release of two Myanmar migrant workers in a protest in Yangon, Myanmar's biggest city, on Friday (Saturday NZ Time), a day after a Thai court sentenced the two to death for the 2014 murders of two young British tourists.

    The court convicted Zaw Lin and Win Zaw Htun of the brutal murder of Hannah Witheridge, 23, and David Miller, 24, on the Thai holiday island of Koh Tao, a case mired in controversy and questions about the police investigation and Thailand's treatment of migrant workers.

    Around 1000 people gathered in front of the Thai embassy in Yangon on Friday, police said, calling for the two to be freed. Dozens of police stood guard and closed a lane in front of the building.


    Killed in Thailand: British tourists Hannah Witheridge and David Miller.
    BRITISH FOREIGN OFFICE

    Some protesters held signs saying: "Shameless Thailand government" while others shouted "We want justice" in English.


    Zaw Lin and Win Zaw Htun were made to take part in a re-enactment of the crime last year.
    REUTERS

    They demonstrators dispersed after their request to see the Thai ambassador was turned down.

    The verdict followed a trial that saw prosecutors build much of their case around DNA evidence that police said linked the two migrant workers to the crime. Defence lawyers argued that police had mishandled the DNA evidence and that the two men were tortured while in detention.

    The killings sullied Thailand's reputation as a happy-go-lucky tourist destination and raised questions over its justice system and its treatment of migrant workers.

    U Win Maung, Myanmar's Ambassador to Thailand, said the verdict would not affect diplomatic ties.

    "Everyone who is a human, if they hear that they are getting the death sentence, they will be sad, but this is the legal procedure so we have to adhere to the legal procedure," U Win Maung told reporters in Bangkok.

    Some activists have argued that the defendants were scapegoats. Thailand hosts about 2.5 million migrants from its poorer neighbour, many of them working in the fishing and construction industry or as domestic helpers or cleaners in hotels and restaurants.

    Amnesty International called for an independent investigation into allegations the Myanmar men were tortured, adding that police in Thailand had a "long and disturbing track record" of using torture to extract "confessions".

    A judge dismissed allegations of torture in the Koh Tao case saying there was no evidence it took place.

    stuff.co.nz

  4. #4

    Burmese protesters call for investigation into killing of British pair

    Saturday 26 December 2015

    YangonDemonstrators.jpg
    Demonstrators in Burma's largest city Rangoon protest against the Thai police investigation into the death of two British backpackers
    AFP

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-a6786141.html

  5. #5
    Thailand backpacker murders: Convicted men insist they will be freed after appeal
    David Eimer
    25 Dec 2015

    Zaw Lin and Wai Phyo were found guilty of killing two Britons but after their conviction, the pair insist an appeal will prove their claimed innocence

    The anguish of the families of the two British backpackers murdered on the Thai island of Koh Tao is set to continue, with the two Burmese migrant workers given the death penalty for the killings convinced that they will be freed after their appeal against their sentences is heard.

    Zaw Lin and Wai Phyo, both 22, are now chained up 24 hours a day in the cell they share with 28 other inmates in Koh Samui’s overcrowded prison, but are continuing to insist they are innocent of the horrific murders of Hannah Witheridge, 23, and David Miller, 24, in September 2014.

    The bodies of Ms Witheridge, from Hemsby, Norfolk, and Mr Miller, from St Helier, Jersey, were found on Sairee Beach on Koh Tao in the early morning of September 15th 2014. Ms Witheridge, 23, had been raped and battered to death with a garden hoe. Mr Miller was left to drown in the sea after being beaten unconscious.

    The death sentences were handed down to the men on Thursday at the end of a sometimes chaotic and always controversial six month trial on the neighbouring island of Koh Samui.

    Unease over the verdicts has prompted calls from human rights groups for an independent investigation into allegations that the pair were tortured by Thai police after they were arrested, while there have been angry protests on Friday in Burma.

    “They feel strongly that the truth will come out one day and that they will be released,” said Andy Hall, a British rights activist who has been assisting with their defence. “They’re in good spirits, but they are now shackled 24 hours a day because this is a death-penalty case and the Koh Samui prison is a low-security jail.”

    Their chains will only be removed after they are transferred to the higher security Nakkon Si Thammarat prison on the Thai mainland in January.

    On Friday, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch expressed their concern over the claims made by the defence during the trial that the pair were tortured by the Koh Tao police into confessing to the murders.

    Subsequently, they retracted their confessions.

    “We’ve documented many cases of migrant workers being beaten and tortured by the Thai police over the years. There clearly is a pattern of abuse by the Thai police towards migrant workers,” Phil Robertson, deputy director of the Asia division of Human Rights Watch, told the Telegraph. “We would like to see an independent investigation, although I think the chances of that happening are very slim.”

    Champa Patel, Amnesty International’s director for south-east Asia, has also called for an inquiry into the claims. “This is far from an isolated case. The Thai police have a long and disturbing track record of using torture to extract so-called confessions,” he told the BBC.

    Zaw Lin detailed the abuse he suffered during his police interrogation in an interview with the Telegraph at the Koh Samui District Prison in July.

    “They slapped me first, then they put three plastic bags over my head. They started punching me in my face and chest, shouting that we did it. I was so hot because of the plastic bags over my head. I couldn’t breathe very well, so I said, ‘Yes, I did it’. I only said that because I was so scared and hot,” said Zaw Lin.

    But on Thursday, the two judges who sentenced them to death said there was no evidence that the pair had been physically assaulted by the police.

    Michael Miller, David’s brother, was adamant also that the guilty verdicts are correct and that the men received a fair trial.

    “It is our opinion that the evidence against Wai Phyo and Zaw Lin is overwhelming,” said Mr Miller, speaking on the behalf of the Miller family outside the Koh Samui Provincial Court after the sentencing. “We believe the correct verdict has been reached.”

    Thailand uses the death penalty rarely, having executed only two people by lethal injection in the last 12 years, both in 2009. With Wai Phyo and Zaw Lin’s lawyers preparing an appeal to Thailand’s Appeals Court, it is possible the sentences will be commuted to life imprisonment at a later date.

    It is likely too, that the Burmese government is putting pressure on the Thai authorities for that to happen. Burma’s ambassador to Thailand met with a senior official from the Thai prime minister's office this morning to discuss the case.

    Anger in Burma over the death sentences has already sparked protests, with a crowd of 1,000 people gathering outside Thailand’s embassy in Rangoon, Burma’s largest city, on Friday.

    Demonstrators held up placards saying “Shameless Thailand Government”, “We Want Justice” and calling for the release of the men.
    Thailand's Appeals Court is expected to rule on the appeal in the next six months to a year.

    telegraph.co.uk

  6. #6
    Thailand, Myanmar try to calm anger over death verdict
    Sunday, 27 December 2015

    BANGKOK: The governments of Thailand and Myanmar are trying their best to calm the anger and dismay that led to protests outside the Thai Embassy in Yangon after a court sentenced two Myanmar migrant workers to death for the murder of two young British backpackers in 2014.

    On Friday, more than 1,000 Yangon residents showed up outside the Royal Thai Embassy from about 10.30am to protest and voice their dissatisfaction over the verdict.

    As of press time, some 100 protesters were still camped outside the embassy, while monks lit candles in front of the building.

    The Criminal Court in Surat Thani province convicted Zaw Lin and Win Zaw Htun of the brutal murder and rape of Hannah Witheridge, 23, and David Miller, 24, on the island of Koh Tao.

    The Dagon township police force blocked Manawhari Road by deploying more personnel than on Thursday, and also blocked the downtown Pyay Road.

    Demonstrators stood on both roads that led to the Thai Embassy, with many holding signs saying “Shameless Thailand government”, “Save Myanmar Poor Boys” and “Free Our Innocent Citizens”, while others screamed “We want justice”.

    “This is just discrimination against us,” demonstrator Min Thein Khaing said.

    “There was little evidence, no witnesses and not much DNA proof, but they still got sentenced to death. It is unfair!”

    Comedian Khin Hlaing, who joined the rally, told reporters: “This cannot be regarded as only two lives of our citizens. It is the image of our country. It is the dignity of our government. Most Thai and Myanmar people believe that they did not kill the two Britons.

    “So we believe it is a miscarriage of justice. We want to know the real truth. We need inclusive cooperation. All stakeholders including the government and non-government organisations are encouraged to join campaigns against the court’s final decision.”

    Meanwhile, the Thai Ambassador to Myanmar met five monks, who handed over a letter addressed to Thailand’s king.

    The envoy promised the monks that the letter would be delivered and that he would tell the Thai government about the reactions in Yangon. The monks said later that the discussion was very fruitful and satisfactory.

    The embassy’s deputy chief of mission, who also met with the demonstrators, faced hostility and some protesters threatened to hit him with water bottles.

    Separately, the Myanmar Journalists Association wrote an open letter to its Thai counterpart, urging it to seek “the truth behind the bureaucratic and judicial judgement”.

    The Myanmar association thanked the Thai Journalists’ Association for assistance during the recent flooding, and said it was time for them to join hands again to fight together for justice, human rights and democratic values.

    thestar.com.my

  7. #7
    Myanmar calls on Thailand to review verdicts on 2 Myanmar workers

    YANGON, Dec. 27 (Xinhua) -- Myanmar's Commander-in-Chief of the Defense Services Senior-General Min Aung Hlaing has called on Thailand to review verdicts concerning two Myanmar migrant workers who have been sentenced to death for murdering two British backpackers in southern Thailand last year.

    Expressing his respect for Thailand's judicial process, Min Aung Hlaing, in his new year message on Saturday evening to Thai Deputy Prime Minister and Defense Minister General Prawit Wongsuwon and Army Chief General Sommai Kaotira, stressed the need to avoid a situation in which the innocent "were wrongly punished."

    He believed that "justice will be done under consideration of mutual respect and bilateral friendly relations between the two countries."
    Meanwhile, a Thai diplomat in Yangon has promised Myanmar protestors that their demand for appeal to the Thai king would be conveyed as soon as possible following demonstrations here against the Thai court's death sentences.

    Myanmar government has voiced rendering assistance to the accused by following an appeal process.

    Hundreds of Myanmar people Friday gathered outside Thai Embassy here in protest against Thai court's verdicts.

    An appeal will be made within a month, with coordination carried out with Lawyers' Council of Thailand, Myanmar Embassy in Thailand and Myanmar's civil society organizations in Thailand before Jan. 11.

    news.xinhuanet.com

  8. #8
    Thailand warns citizens not to visit Myanmar amid protests over death sentence on 2 migrants
    2 hours ago

    342.jpg
    Demonstrators hold placards outside the Thai embassy as they protest against the death sentence of Myanmar labour workers Zaw Lin and Win Zaw Tun for the murder of two British backpackers.
    PHOTO: AFP

    BANGKOK (THE NATION/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) - The authorities in the areas bordering Thailand and Myanmar on Saturday (Dec 26) warned Thai nationals not to visit Myanmar at this time, as thousands of people held protests across the border after a Thai court's death sentence verdict against two Myanmar migrants last week.

    Peaceful protests were held in the Tachilek and Taungoo border towns in Myanmar on Saturday. And some 60 people continued with their protests for a third day outside the Thai Embassy in Yangon on the same day.

    In Tachilek town, across Chiang Rai's Mae Sai district, some 2,000 people gathered at a local stadium about 2km from the border area.

    They protested against the Samui Provincial Court's ruling last Thursday that handed down death penalties on Myanmar men Zaw Lin and Win Zaw Htun for the 2014 murders of British tourists David Miller and Hannah Witheridge.

    Protest leaders submitted a letter to the Thai border authorities, who accepted it on behalf of the Thai government. The letter called for a fair and just trial.

    Thai authorities temporarily closed the border checkpoint for safety reasons. The protesters dispersed peacefully later yesterday. The border checkpoint was reopened shortly afterwards.

    At Taungoo town, about 400 Myanmar people protested against the court ruling. Some of the protesters were Myanmar migrant workers from the Thai side of the border.

    The protest was peaceful, and they dispersed at about 4pm.

    The local authorities in Kanchanaburi's Sangkhla Buri district, which is across the border from the Myanmar town, urged Thai tourists in Myanmar to return home urgently and advised those about to cross the border to delay their visit.

    About 60 protesters gathered yesterday outside the Thai Embassy in Yangon, which was closed for the weekend. The demonstration was peaceful and security officials were sent to monitor the situation, according to Foreign Affairs Ministry spokesman Sek Wannamethee.

    Foreign Minister Don Pramudwinai said yesterday that he did not think the protests in Myanmar would worsen and sour ties between the two countries.

    He said the Thai government was aware of the protesters' demands. "But we have to let the justice process to take its course anyway. That's an international standard of practice. The Thai court system is acceptable," he said.

    The two Myanmar convicts were yesterday transferred from a jail on Koh Samui to the Nakhon Si Thammarat prison. They were moved early on Saturday morning to a maximum-security prison that is intended for convicts sentenced to life imprisonment or the death penalty.

    Meanwhile, the Thai Journalists' Association (TJA) yesterday issued a statement in response to an earlier statement by the Myanmar Journalists' Association about the court verdict.

    The TJA said it agreed with the MJA that as journalists, "our responsibility is to seek truth and justice".

    The statement said: "We see the utmost importance of seeking truth and justice, especially in such a controversial case like the tragedy on Koh Tao. The Thai media has already engaged in investigative reporting on this case throughout the judicial process."

    Pressure from Myanmar has also come from the National League for Democracy (NLD), which won the recent general elections.

    The party issued a statement urging the Myanmar government to give necessary assistance in filing an appeal on behalf of the Koh Tao convicts.

    The NLD also welcomed the protest against the court decision outside the Thai Embassy in a way that would not tarnish the country's dignity, Eleven Myanmar reported on Saturday.

    straitstimes.com

  9. #9
    Death row Myanmar pair ‘secretly’ moved to new Thai prison
    Saturday, 26 December 2015


    One of the two Myanmar migrant workers who are accused of the killing of two British tourists, Zaw Lin is escorted by a Thai police officer after they were sentenced to death at the Samui Provincial Court on Koh Samui Island, Surat Thani province, southern Thailand, 24 December 2015.
    Photo: Rungroj Yongrit/EPA

    Thai media is reporting that the two Myanmar migrant workers sentenced to death for the murders of two British tourists on Thailand's Koh Tao island have been "secretly" moved to a new prison.

    Migrant workers activist Andy Hall reports: “Thai media confirm as we expected this morning's high security and secret transfer of Zaw Lin/Wai Phyo to Nakhon Si Thammarat Prison.”

    Mr Hall said Koh Samui Governor Pornthip cannot for security reasons confirm the transfer at present.

    The Migrant Worker Rights Network are said to be urgently liaising with defense lawyers to ensure the lawyers team can gain access to Zaw Lin and Wai Phyo next week to assess their incarceration conditions.

    “MWRN remains committed to ensuring humanitarian support to both guys and ensuring their stein mental and physical health to fight the years of appeal of their death penalty conviction that will now follow,” said Mr Hall.

    Protests have been held in Yangon outside the Thai embassy over the Dec. 24 verdict that found the two Myanmar nationals guilty of the murder of the two British tourists on Koh Tao island in September 2014. Questions have been raised by the defence team, other lawyers, and rights groups over the conduct of the case.

    The defence team is working on an appeal.

    mizzima.com

  10. #10
    Thai diplomat promises to convey Myanmar protestors' demand to Thai king
    Editor: xuxin

    YANGON, Dec. 26 (Xinhua) -- A Thai diplomat in Yangon has promised Myanmar protestors that their demand for appeal to the Thai king would be conveyed following demonstration here against Thai court's death sentences given to two Myanmar men, an official report said Saturday.

    Thai Consul Chatnopdol Aksornsawad told the protestors that he cannot interfere in his country's justice system, adding he can convey their demand to the king and the people of Thailand in sympathy with the feeling of the Myanmar people.

    Myanmar government officials have noted on their Facebook accounts that the government will assist the accused with an appeal process.

    Hundreds of Myanmar people Friday gathered outside the Thai Embassy here in protest against Thai court's death sentence verdict on two Myanmar migrant workers for murdering two British backpackers in southern Thailand last year.

    People from all walks of life, including Buddhist monks, political activists and artists, participated in the protest demanding the release of the two Myanmar young men.

    An appeal will be launched against the death sentences within a month, and coordination will also be made among lawyers' council of Thailand, Myanmar Embassy in Thailand and Myanmar's civil society organizations in Thailand before Jan. 11.

    news.xinhuanet.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •